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A minor border crisis

4 yr oldYes, that’s a 4-year-old.

Of the  168,000 caught illegally entering the United States in the Rio Grande Valley from October, 2013 to May, 2014, 33,000 were “unaccompanied” minors.   Since 75% are from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, we are also supposed to believe that they traveled the entire length of Mexico not only without their parents, but without the Mexican authorities even noticing.

 

In the meantime, many have reported physical and sexual abuse in “shelters.”

 

The root cause of the influx is obvious. Our President is aware of the lawlessness and is using the children in a in a political ploy to beat at the resistance to immigration reform in the US.  (“Obama delivered a commencement address at a technical school in Worcester, where he said 30 to 40 percent of the students were children of immigrants.”)

 

And now, we hear that ICE releases 90% of the children to “sponsors.” Not just with family members, but with “friends* already in the country. Who is to say what happens to the children when the authorities can’t even keep up with their whereabouts? Are they being further abused and trafficked?

 

No one knows. There doesn’t seem to be any way – or any effort? – to track them once they are released.

 

The simplest and most urgent need would be to close the border to more illegal crossings. At the same time, we must convince Mexico to stop ignoring the passage of hundreds of thousands illegally making their way through that country. We should also begin to track at least the minors we have already taken into custody after they are released. Finally, we must return these children and families to their homes in their own country.

 

 

This is not the time for hyperbole and political grandstanding, but for practical action. My concern is not only that our national security and sovereignty is severely compromised: If our current immigration and border control policies result in human trafficking and child abuse, we may see a lasting international debacle.

We will not be suckered by elitist Republicans

George Rodriguez explains the new #RPT Immigration plank. Hint: there’s a reason it was placed in the “Sovereignty” subsection.

Opposing them were citizen delegates — taxpayers, consumers and ordinary citizens who see their lives growing more difficult because the American dream is slipping away. They saw the “Texas Solution” as a cheap-labor plank masquerading as Hispanic outreach that would complicate an already out-of-control immigration crisis.

Grassroots conservatives over the past year also began to realize that the “Texas Solution” was light on enforcement. Given that over 160,000 illegal immigrants have been detained on the South Texas border since October 2013, these conservatives knew that any immigration solution must start with border security.

The new party platform truly addresses immigration in several ways.

via We will not be suckered by elitist Republicans.

What Cantor’s Defeat Means « Commentary Magazine

Perhaps that #RPT Immigration plank wasn’t a fluke, after all. This is much bigger than the Tea Party, alone. Or the Tea Party is bigger than anyone thought!

 

Eric Cantor wasn’t supposed to lose. His own pollster had him up by, get this, 34 points the other week. He’d raised nearly $5 million, and in the past two weeks spent $1 million against his rival’s $79,000. Not enough.

**********

So is this a case of the Republican Right eating one of its own to prove a point? Perhaps. Or it could just be he was hit by a perfect storm of anti-Washington sentiment and his own advocacy for an immigration bill that made him a whipping boy for ratings-hungry radio chatters. He lost touch with the voters in his own district and was done in.

via What Cantor’s Defeat Means « Commentary Magazine.

Immigration crisis 101: Why the wave of incoming kids, and what to do? – CSMonitor.com

The border patrol is coping with the swell by releasing many of the migrant mothers with children on their own recognizance, with a date for a deportation hearing in hand. Some of the unaccompanied minors are being released to the custody of parents or relatives in the US. One flaw in that approach: Only 40 percent of those accused of being in the United States illegally ever show up for court, according to former federal immigration Judge Mark Metcalf.

How is this influx different from past immigration waves?

Overall illegal immigration into the US is about half the rate of its apex in 2005. It plummeted with the rise of the Great Recession and high US unemployment, beefed-up border security, and a stronger economy in Mexico. At the peak of illegal entries, immigrants apprehended from Central America accounted for 400,000 border-crossers. The total is now at about 180,000, but it is rapidly pushing up.

What’s different this time is that the undocumented immigrants from Central America are disproportionately younger, apparently trying to escape from strife-torn and murder-wracked countries. Many of the children are reported to be seeking to join their undocumented parents or relatives already in the US.

via Immigration crisis 101: Why the wave of incoming kids, and what to do? – CSMonitor.com.

Why Are Children Flooding the U.S. Border?

Government officials from Guatemala and Honduras have also gone to speak to the children. None appeared to have been kidnapped, robbed or abused during their journey through Mexico, which is a departure from the common experience of transmigrants. The children also said that it had taken them between less than a week to cross through Mexico, a voyage that typically takes migrants about a month.

via Why Are Children Flooding the U.S. Border?.

El Paso officials were not notified about immigrant release – El Paso Times

•Southwest border apprehensions: (Oct. 1- May 31) 323,675, a 15 percent increase from fiscal year 2013.

•Rio Grande Valley (South Texas) border apprehensions: (Oct. 1-May 31) 163,542, a 74 percent increase from fiscal year 2013.

•Southwest border apprehensions of Other-than-Mexican citizens: (Oct. 1 -May 31) 162,757, 50 percent of the total Southwest border apprehensions.

•Rio Grande Valley (South Texas) border apprehensions of Other-than-Mexican citizens: (Oct. 1-May 31) 122,070, 75 percent of total Rio Grande Valley apprehensions.

via El Paso officials were not notified about immigrant release – El Paso Times.

About Those RPT Convention Votes and Immigration

Raise your hand if you were one of the delegates to the Republican Party of Texas Convention who voted for the plank but didn’t have a clue what you were voting for. I didn’t think any of you did. I certainly knew what I was voting for.

In case you were incompetent or driven by ugly emotions when you voted on the Platform – and for those who weren’t there but are hearing from the media and even some Republicans: Here’s the Immigration Plank we voted into the Platform: http://wp.me/p1FiCk-1cj and here’s my review of the controversy on the floor of the Convention: http://wp.me/p1FiCk-1ce

The press has been running an increasing number of articles about the crisis in our State resulting in the arrest of over a 1000 people a day in the Rio Grande Valley alone – 148,000 in 7 months, compared with 60,000 caught in Arizona. Over 47,000 of the Rio Grande detainees were minor boys and girls, some as young as 8 years old, since last October. 75% are from El Salvador, Guatemala, and the Honduras, countries other than Mexico.

I don’t fully support only two of the many points in the new plank. For one thing, I’m not convinced about ending in-state tuition for young kids who are brought here before 15 years old who go on to graduate from our high schools. Although I do worry that we are drawing those minors numbered above. In addition, I’m concerned about new Federal data banks and the usefulness of E-verify.

However, I agree with the bulk of the Plank, especially the call for a secure border. I agree with the suggested cooperation between law enforcement branches and relieving ranchers from the fear that they and landowners will face crippling civil suits if a trespasser is harmed on their land while in the country illegally.

I’ve seen some confusion about this line: “Contiguous physical barrier coupled with electronic, infrared and visual monitoring.” That’s support for a fence that’s actually on the border where the two countries meet, rather than miles in. It’s not a call for a continuous fence all along the border, but one where it’s needed and supplemented by actual people and technology where they are needed.

My main sticking point was the Committee report’s appearance of asking for a “provisional visa program,” that apparently started with “the participant’s” application from within the country by people here illegally. That’s why I decided that the plank is a good compromise for our Party. I strongly approve of the statement that “Any form of Amnesty should not be granted, including the granting of legal status to persons in the country illegally”

Edit: cleaned up grammar and typos, 6:22 AM 6/10/14 – BBN

Immigration Plank of Republican Party of Texas Platform 2014

Amendment to Preliminary 2014 Platform of the Republican Party of Texas Submitted by Peter Batura, SD 17

http://www.netarrantteaparty.com/wp-content/uploads/immigration-plank.pdf

America is proudly a nation of immigrants. Throughout our history, our nation has attracted productive, industrious and gifted people to America because she is exceptional, and those immigrants and their descendants helped make America the world’s unrivaled economic and military superpower. It remains imperative to create fair and consistent procedures that will again enable freedom-loving, hard-working and law-abiding immigrants to join us, by providing them an efficient, practical method of legal entry, so they can lawfully take positions where their labor is needed, without exploitation or harassment.

Our national interests are poorly served by our broken, embattled, and outdated immigration system, and patchwork attempts to mend its deficiencies will not prepare us to continue to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex global economy that demands the legal movement of people to fill jobs at all skill levels. An efficient, profamily and market-based system will provide a more workable solution that is compassionate, equitable and respects the rule of law.

But by failing to create a rational and effective system that encourages and facilitates legal immigration to the benefit of the nation, Congress has forced states to deal with the consequences of a broken immigration system, including human, sex and drug trafficking, the direct criminal activities of cartels and gangs. This situation must end so America can, once again, enjoy the fruits of a vibrant and beneficial system of legal immigration.

In addition, with 92 million Americans not working, the labor force at 36-year low and a lethargic economy, the United States of America can ill-afford a guest worker program designed to depress wages.

The following outlines specific actions needed to address these critical issues:

• Secure the borders through

o Increasing in the number of border security officers
o Increasing joint operations and training with local law enforcement, DPS and the Texas State Guard
o Contiguous physical barrier coupled with electronic, infrared and visual monitoring

• Ending In-State Tuition for Illegal Immigrants

• Enhancing state smuggling laws

• Prohibiting sanctuary cities

• Prohibiting the knowing employment of illegal immigrants

• Providing civil liability protections for landowners against illegal immigrants

• Protecting the ability of law enforcement officers to inquire of the status of someone in custody

• Modernizing Current Immigration Laws to address the following:

o Any form of Amnesty should not be granted, including the granting of legal status to persons in the country illegally
o We support replacement of the current employment visa system with an efficient cost effective system
o We support ending country of origin quotas
o We support ending the annual green card lottery

• Once the borders are verifiably secure, and E-Verify system use is fully enforced, creation of a visa classification for non-specialty industries which have demonstrated actual and persistent labor shortages.

On the Immigration Plank of the Republican Party of Texas

I am proud of the heritage of our Republican Party of Texas as welcoming citizens of all backgrounds who hold faith, family and freedom as our principles and who ask others to simply follow the law.

 
Now, I’m hearing – and reading on Facebook – that it’s the fault of myself and the Republican Party of Texas that ObamaCare was forced on us at midnight on New Years’ Day *and* that it’s my fault that there are (an estimated) 12 Million illegal aliens have entered and are currently residing without status in the US.

 
Absolutely, unequivocally: NO!

 
This exact line of “reasoning” from the Chair of the Platform Committee, Tom Mechler, is what made me join the fight against what came to be known as the “Provisional Visa Program,” but was formerly the “Texas Solution.” Until Mechler made these claims, I was hoping for a blending of the positions of the two groups. (I was even called a “liberal” on a post on this blog.)

 
It’s not our fault! We have petitioned our State and Federal Legislators, our Governor, our Party. Some few of our citizens have joined patrols and militias and have been vilified. This week, many of us took our time and effort to testify to the subcommittee considering the Immigration Plank.

 
They didn’t listen. Instead, the leaders who initiated the battle over the “Texas Solution” engaged in overt gamesmanship.

 

 

The language that was printed under the heading of the “Minority Report” failed because the vote in Committee, actually on a motion to replace the language we later saw as the “Committee Report,” was a tie. At 15-15, there was no 50%+1 majority vote and the previous language prevailed. I had been told that the Chair voted to break the tie, when in fact the motion failed because he did not vote.  TJ Scott, the delegate to the Committee from SD 14, led the “minority.”

 

 

Rather than allowing Mr. Scott, the author, to read the “Minority Report,” Chairman Mechler chose his man to read the “minority report.” Mr. Ramsey (SD 7), moved to immediately amend the Committee’s report, jumping right over the** “minority report.” (Ramsey even claimed to be the author, but was forced to retract that claim from the stage.  He later said that he was talking about being the author of the amendment.)

 
I believe that TJ spent nearly all day Friday trying to determine the proper procedure. He did exactly what he was told was the correct thing. He was misled.

 
In fact, I was the first to turn in an amendment (and the 6th), but the Chair decided that the order of amendments were submitted meant nothing. The only thing that mattered was getting to a microphone first. Then, he gave the mic to Mechler, who gave it to Ramsey.

 

 

 

Fortunately for all of us, one of our members was able to win the battle of the microphones and presented an amendment that was truly a compromise. (I’ll publish the new Immigration plank as soon as it’s online.)
The newest argument is that the Delegates passed the Amendment without knowing what we were voting for. (Totally ignoring that they voted for what Chairman Munisteri repeatedly called “the Ramsey language,” presented the same way, without a paper copy.) That is certainly not true for me. The clerk read the entire amendment out loud and we were able to read along with her. I was able to understand what I was voting for and trust that the bulk of the delegates who voted with me are just as capable of understanding.
There is no call for deportation in the Final 2014 Platform. There is a demand that the magnets which draw the illegal aliens to our State be ended. There *is* approval of a guest worker visa when needed. It does not micro-manage the details of the visa.

 
(BTW, doesn’t it seem odd that some people are demanding a “living wage,” while others advocate adding millions of low-income workers through a guest worker program?)

 

 

Finally, I hope that the Republican Party of Texas will post the Final 2014 Platform on-line so that we can all review exactly what we are discussing. In the meantime, I encourage everyone to read the Platform for common ground, rather than the differences.

We Republicans remain the Party of life, liberty and property. We are the Party which best defends the Constitution of the State of Texas and the United States and faith, family and freedom!

*** Edited 6/8/14 at 9:48PM to correct the statement that Mr. Ramsey moved to amend the “minority report, by inserting “the Committee’s report, jumping right over the.” Of course, Mr Ramsey made the motion to amend the Committee’s report, after reading the minority report.

Update at 10:40 PM, clarification about that tie vote in the Committee.

Draft (not at all final!) RPT Temporary Rules Committee report

This is an experiment to evaluate how easily these  Reports of the (very rough, not final!) Temporary Committees may be shared online.

The Draft Rules will be amended tonight at the meeting of the Permanent Rules Committee and there will be another chance for the Delegates of the RPT Convention to amend them on the floor.

The Draft is 38 pages on Microsoft Word. I didn’t take the time to make all the highlights and underscores to show the markup. I will attempt to do so as soon as I can.

What I have is here http://wp.me/p1FiCk-1c9

I will remove the copy of the draft rules as soon as they are finally revised and I will update this page,  as well as post links to the final drafts as soon as I can.

I am going to close comments on these pages.

38 Page Draft Temporary *Draft* 2014 RPT Rules Report

GENERAL RULES FOR ALL CONVENTIONS AND MEETINGS

Rule No. 1 – Adoption and Amendment of Rules; Clarification
These Rules, having been filed with the Secretary of State of Texas, together with the statutes, rules, and bylaws adopted by reference shall constitute the Rules of the Republican Party of Texas (“Rules”).
a. Amendments – Amendments to Rules may be proposed by:
1. Majority vote of the State Republican Executive Committee (“SREC”), at any meeting properly called and constituted, provided at least seven (7) days prior written notice of the full text proposed has been given in writing to each member thereof; or
2. The A Temporary or Permanent Rules Committee of any State Convention.
b. Adoption – These Rules, with the exception of Permanent State Executive Committee Rules, required or authorized by state law, may be changed only by action of a State Convention, such action reflecting a majority of votes cast by delegates present and voting. When any change is made, a certified copy of the changes shall be filed with the Secretary of State not later than thirty (30) days following their adoption.
c. Temporary and Emergency Changes – The SREC in its best judgment, by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of those present and voting, provided prior written notice of the full text proposed has been given to each member thereof, may prescribe such temporary and emergency changes of these Rules so as to permit the orderly conduct of the affairs of the Republican Party of Texas in accordance with the intent and purpose of these Rules. Such temporary and emergency changes may be made when the conduct, operation, or implementation of these Rules will become frustrated or impracticable, or contrary to their intent and purpose, if by reason of:
1. valid laws enacted by the Legislature of the State of Texas;
2. any administrative or judicial action of any officer, or agency of the State of Texas or any county or political subdivision thereof, or of the Federal Government;
3. any interpretation of these Rules as they relate to The Rules of the Republican Party by any duly authorized official of the Republican National Committee; or
4. technical inconsistencies or defects.
Any such changes shall be valid only until such time, if any, as they are ratified or amended by the next subsequent State Convention, or until the adjournment of such State Convention, whichever shall occur first.
d. Permanent State Executive Committee Rules – The SREC, as authorized by Section 163.004(a)(2)(B), Election Code, by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of those present and voting, provided at least seven (7) days prior written notice of the full text proposed has been given to each member thereof, may prescribe Permanent State Executive Committee Rules that are not subject to amendment by action of a State Convention.
1. These Permanent State Executive Committee Rules may be amended by the SREC by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of those present and voting at any meeting properly called and constituted, provided at least seven (7) days prior written notice of the full text proposed has been given in writing to each member thereof. Any Permanent State Executive Committee Rule shall be identified in these Rules by the notation “(Permanent State Executive Committee Rule).”
2. At the first meeting of each term the SREC may, by a vote of a majority of those present and voting, delegate temporary authority to amend a Permanent State Executive Committee Rule to a State Rules Committee of the subsequent State Convention, except for Rule Number 1, as the State Rules Committee determines and reports to the State Convention for consideration. Said temporary authority shall expire with the adjournment of the State Convention. Any Permanent State Executive Committee Rule delegated to the State Convention shall be identified in these Rules by the notation “(Permanent State Executive Committee Rule delegated to the State Convention).”
e. Pursuant to Section 163.006, Texas Election Code, any amendments made to these rules and contained herein which govern or affect the Republican Party of Texas’ general or runoff primary elections, conventions or nominees, are effective January 1 on the odd-numbered year following adoption.
f. Clarification – Any member of the Republican Party of Texas who discovers an ambiguity in these Rules may request in writing a clarification from the County Chairman or the State Chairman. Clarification from the State Chairman shall be binding on all members of the Republican Party of Texas until final clarification is made by majority vote of the SREC. Any clarification made shall be to maintain the intent and purpose of these Rules as originally adopted.
g. Definitions – Pursuant to the incorporation of Section 311.014 of the Texas Government Code under Rule 4 of these Rules, when computing any period of days referred to in these Rules, the first (1st) day is excluded and the last day is included. Also, if the last day of any period of days is a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, then the period is extended to include the next day that is not a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

Rule No. 2 – Publication and Distribution of Rules
In order to publicize these Rules throughout the state, prior to the Precinct Conventions, copies thereof and of those pertinent portions of the Election Code dealing with Party conventions at all levels shall be mailed to each County Chairman and each Senatorial District Convention Chairman with instructions to supply a copy to each Precinct Chairman and to each County or District Convention Committee Chairman. Upon request, a copy shall be provided to any delegate or alternate to the State Convention and to any other interested person who shall request the same; and an adequate supply thereof shall be maintained at the Republican Party of Texas Headquarters to fill requests. A charge, which shall be no greater than the unit cost of printing and postage, may be made for requested copies of these Rules.

Rule No. 3 – Discrimination Prohibited
Participation in any Republican convention or meeting including, but not limited to, any primary caucus, any meeting or convention held for the purposes of selecting delegates to a County, District, State or National Convention shall in no way be abridged for reason of sex, age, race, religion, color, or national origin.

Rule No. 4 – Adoption of Reference – U.S. Constitution, Texas Constitution and Statutes
The Constitution of the United States, The Constitution of the State of Texas, and the statutes of the State of Texas, insofar as they may be applicable, are hereby adopted by reference and shall govern the conduct of all conventions and meetings of the Republican Party of Texas from the precinct level through the state level.

Rule No. 5 – Parliamentary Authority
Unless otherwise provided for by the United States Constitution, Texas Constitution, United States and Texas statutes, or these Rules, the current edition of Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised, which is hereby adopted by reference, shall be the parliamentary authority governing all conventions and meetings of the Republican Party of Texas from the precinct level through the state level, inclusive.

Rule No. 6 – Proxies Prohibited
The use of proxies or proxy voting is hereby prohibited in all Republican Party of Texas proceedings, from the precinct level through the state level, inclusive except the SREC.

Rule No. 7 – Casting Votes
a. At all conventions, executive committee meetings and any other Party meetings, votes shall be cast and counted in the manner prescribed by the current edition of Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised; and except as provided in this rule, the vote of each member shall have equal weight. A county executive committee may authorize mailed ballot voting to fill precinct chair vacancies. In any convention except a Precinct Convention or a State Convention when organized in Congressional District Caucuses, any delegation present, upon request, shall be permitted to cast the number of votes equal to the number of delegates to which it is entitled on any item of business.

b. A roll call vote shall be taken:
1. when ordered by majority vote of the delegates at any convention, caucus, or meeting, or
2. when demanded by one-fifth (1/5) of the participants at a Precinct Convention, or
3. when demanded in writing by at least one-fifth (1/5) of the delegations from the precincts represented at a County or Senatorial District Convention, or
4. when demanded in writing by at least one-fifth (1/5) of the delegations from the districts represented at a State Convention, or
5. when demanded in writing by one-fifth (1/5) of the members in the case of a committee meeting, Party caucus, or
6. when by decision of a Convention Chairman.

In the event of a roll call vote, each Delegation Chairman shall poll his delegation and shall announce the result when his delegation is reached. If any delegate doubts the correctness of the announcement, the Secretary of the meeting shall poll such delegation and announce the result.

Rule No. 8 – Supplementary Executive Committee Rules – Meetings
a. Compliance Required – The SREC, each county executive committee, each district executive committee and any committee or sub-committee created by any Bylaws or Rules adopted by same, shall comply with and be established in accordance with these Rules.
b. Supplemental Rules Permitted – A State Republican Executive Committee elected at the Biennial State Convention or a County Executive Committee elected in biennial Primary Election or a District Executive Committee created pursuant to the Texas Election Code or the Bylaws of any political subdivision within the Party, may adopt Supplemental Rules or Bylaws, provided however that such Rules or Bylaws do not conflict with any Rules or Bylaws of a higher authority including, but not limited to these Rules. All such Rules and Bylaws shall be filed with the SREC and with the Secretary of State and are hereby adopted by reference.
c. Organizational Meeting of the State Republican Executive Committee – The SREC shall hold its organizational meeting after the adjournment of the Biennial State Convention.
d. Organizational Meeting of a County Executive Committee – A County shall hold its organizational meeting within forty-five (45) days after the term of office begins for the County Chairman and the Precinct Chairmen. (This is twenty (20) days after the Primary Run-off Election according to Subsection 171.022 (c) of the TEC.) The County Chairman shall be responsible for calling the meeting however, if the County Chairman does not call the meeting, then one-fourth (1/4) of the Precinct Chairmen may, by written demand, call an organizational meeting. Notice of the organizational meeting shall be mailed by USPS to the last known address of the members of the executive committee at least fourteen (14) days prior to the date of the meeting and such notice shall state the time, date and location of the meeting and the names(s) of the person(s) issuing the call. The agenda of the organizational meeting shall include, but not be limited to, the swearing in of the newly elected executive committee members and the adoption of Bylaws and/or Rules for the biennium. The proposed Bylaws and/or Rules shall by sent out with the meeting call via USPS at least fourteen (14) days prior to the date of the meeting.
e. Limitations on County Executive Committee meetings – No County Executive Committee meeting shall be held during the week of the Biennial State Convention or the quadrennial National Convention.
f. Open Meetings and Right to Testify – All meetings of any committee, sub-committee or ad hoc committee of any State or County Executive Committee shall be open to any member of that executive committee, and they shall have the right to appear before any such committee, sub-committee or ad hoc committee and make recommendations for the committee’s consideration or testify concerning any item under purview of the committee. The committee may adopt reasonable rules including time limits for such presentations and may establish a reasonable limit of time for these presentations. This Rule does not preclude the committee from going into executive session; however, such executive session(s) shall be open to any member of the executive committee including ex-officio members.
g. The County Chairman shall maintain a current list of the name, mailing address, phone number, email address (if available), and precinct number of every Republican Precinct Chair who was elected in the Primary, the Primary Runoff, or was appointed by the County Executive Committee to fill a Precinct Chair vacancy. The list shall be updated within seven (7) business days of an election changing the status of the list and shall be made available at reproduction costs or by email to any Republican Precinct Chair, Republican Party Official, Republican Elected Office Holder, or Republican Candidate for Elective Office of the county requesting such.
h. Filling Vacancies on a County Executive Committee (Permanent State Executive Committee Rule) – A County Executive Committee shall, by majority vote at its organizational meeting, adopt a Bylaw and/or Rule for filling vacancies on the County Executive Committee.

Rule No. 9 – Executive Committee Quorum
a. Non-Statutory Business and Filling Vacancies – At County or District Executive Committee meetings, one-fourth (1/4) of the membership, excluding vacancies, shall constitute a quorum for conduct of non-statutory business. As provided by Section 171.024(c), Texas Election Code, the SREC has designated one-fourth (1/4) of the membership, excluding vacancies, or such greater percentage, not to exceed a majority of the membership, as may be specified in County Executive Committee Bylaws and/or Rules as quorum for filling vacancies on County Executive Committees (Permanent State Executive Committee Rule). At SREC meetings, the quorum for conduct of non-statutory business shall be in accordance with the SREC bylaws. If the quorum provided above is not present at any executive committee meeting, then only statutory business (called for by the Texas Election Code) may be transacted at a meeting.
b. Statutory Business – At SREC, County, or District Executive Committee meetings, a quorum for conduct of statutory business (called for by the Texas Election Code) shall consist of those members present.

GENERAL RULES FOR ALL CONVENTIONS

Rule No. 10 – Supplementary Convention Rules
a. Any convention may adopt temporary or permanent rules which supplement these Rules, as long as such supplementary rules do not conflict herewith.
b. Any convention committee may adopt supplemental rules related to its proceedings provided that such rules do not conflict with these rules or any supplemental rules adopted by the convention.

Rule No. 11 – Convention Officials Listed – Challenge
a. Convention Officials – The officers of any convention, whether it be in temporary or permanent organization, shall consist of a Chairman, a Secretary, a Sergeant-at-Arms, and such other officers as the Chairman may deem necessary. The Secretary and the Sergeant-at-Arms shall have the power to appoint assistants. The permanent officers, except parliamentarian, shall be elected or appointed from among the convention delegates.
b. Challenge – Any officer or committee chairman of any convention, whether it be in temporary or permanent organization, who intentionally violates the Rules of the Republican Party of Texas or the directives of the Texas Election Code, shall be subject to a challenge filed under the provisions of Rule No. 27; and if such challenge is upheld by the Convention which hears the challenge, that officer or committee chairman shall be removed from serving as a delegate to any convention of the Party at any level throughout the year.

Rule No. 12 – Resolutions Authorized – No Unit Rule
Any convention may express its sense on an issue by adopting a resolution on that issue; however, the use of the unit rule (whereby the entire delegation votes as a unit not recognizing the minority votes within the delegation) or the practice of giving binding instructions to the delegates shall not be permitted at any level of the convention process.

Rule No. 13 – Convention Quorum – Adjournment
a. Precinct Convention – There shall be no quorum to convene or continue a Precinct Convention.
b. County/District Convention – A quorum to convene a County/District Convention shall consist of a majority of the delegates registered as attending. Thereafter, a quorum shall be considered present as long as:
1. The number of votes represented by delegates in attendance comprises more than fifty percent (50%) of the total voting strength of the Convention;
2. A majority of the seated precincts are present; and
3. One-third (1/3) of the seated delegates are present.
c. State Convention – A quorum to convene the State Convention shall consist of a majority of the delegates registered as attending. Thereafter, a quorum shall be considered present as long as:
1. The number of votes represented by delegates in attendance comprises more than fifty percent (50%) of the total voting strength of the Convention;
2. A majority of the seated districts are present; and
3. One-third (1/3) of the seated delegates are present.
d. Adjournment – In order to adjourn a convention for lack of a quorum, the Chair shall verify the absence of a quorum, using the aforementioned criteria, and such verification shall be made part of the convention minutes; provided however, that no quorum shall be required for consideration of the report of a nominations committee or for the election of delegates and alternates.

Rule No. 14 – Open Meeting and Right to Testify
i. All meetings of any committee or sub-committee of any convention, whether it be in temporary or permanent organization, shall be open to any delegate or alternate to that convention, any State or County Republican Party Officer, any elected Republican Public Officeholder or any Republican Candidate. These same people shall have the right to appear before any convention committee or sub-committee and make recommendations for the committee’s consideration or testify concerning any item under purview of the committee and to record the proceedings with electronic devices. The committee may adopt reasonable rules including time limits for such presentations and may establish a reasonable limit of time for these presentations. This privilege shall include delegates and alternates under challenge at any convention pursuant to Rule No. 35. Nothing in this Rule shall be construed as to prohibit individual Committee members, whether they be in temporary or permanent organization, from communicating with one another about business to come before their Committee, in any manner they choose, prior to the convening of their first Committee meeting or at any other time outside of their official Committee meeting or meetings. Notice of any meetings of any temporary committee or sub-committee of any Senatorial District or County Convention shall be posted on the website of the county party, if any, prior to the date of the meeting.
ii. An official video recording may be made of all general sessions and any meetings of any committee of the state convention, whether it be in temporary or permanent organization.

Rule No. 15 – Identification Required
Any person present at any convention must identify himself when requested to do so by the Sergeant-at-Arms, his assistants, or any other officer of the convention.

Rule No. 15A – Distribution of Literature
Literature may be freely distributed in the delegate and alternate seating areas of any State or County/Senatorial District Convention or Caucus, provided that the items being distributed display the name and address of the person and/or organization represented.
Any such literature distributed without the name of the person and/or organization represented shall be removed.
Rule No. 16 – Previous Question
a. Previous Question – At any convention, when the previous question has been moved and seconded and is sustained by a majority vote, the question shall be deemed to have been called and a vote shall occur upon the pending question, except as provided in subsection b of this Rule.
b. Exception – At any convention, a motion to move the previous question or to close nomination concerning any election, including the election of delegates and alternates shall not be in order until there has been reasonable opportunity for additional nominations, debate and/or amendment.

Rule No. 17 – Debate
a. Main Motions – No delegate shall speak for more than five (5) minutes on a main motion without the general consent of the Convention; nor shall he speak more than once on the same motion without general consent.
b. Amendments and Secondary Motions – No delegate shall speak more than three (3) minutes on any amendment or debatable motion subsequently made while a main motion is pending without the general consent of the Convention; nor shall he speak more than once on the same motion without general consent.
c. Committee Reports – The delegate making the committee report and the delegate making the minority report of any convention committee may speak on such report for up to ten (10) minutes, and may then answer legitimate questions asked by any delegate relating to such report.
d. Limiting Debate – Any Convention, by majority vote, may limit or extend equally the time and the number of speakers for each side of a debatable motion.

Rule No. 18 – Voting Strength – Number of Delegates
The Convention will continue to enjoy its full strength in the cases of preceding Conventions not electing all delegates to which it is entitled. No Convention shall elect fractional delegates; i.e. no Convention shall elect more delegates or alternates than the number to which it is entitled.

Rule No. 18A – No Amendments After Adjournment
The minutes of any precinct, county, or senatorial district convention may not be amended to add any delegate or alternate, or strike any elected delegate or alternate after adjournment of that convention.

GENERAL RULES FOR PRECINCT CONVENTIONS

Rule No. 19 – Date, Time, and Place for Precinct Conventions (Permanent State Executive Committee Rule)
On or after the day of the General Primary Election in each even numbered year, Precinct Conventions shall be held in each precinct at the date, time and place designated by the County Executive Committee or in its failure to act, the County Chairman; provided that the place of such convention shall be large enough to accommodate the expected number of participants and must meet the same requirements for access by the elderly and persons with physical disabilities as a polling place..

Rule No. 20 – Qualifications for Participation
The only qualifications for participation in a Precinct Convention, being an officer of such convention or being elected a delegate to the County, Senatorial District, or State Conventions shall be that the person must be a registered voter of that precinct or a resident of that precinct who is eligible to vote a limited ballot and shall have established Party affiliation. Party affiliation may be established by voting in the Republican General Primary or by other means as prescribed by law, provided he has not been disqualified under this Rule or Rule No. 11. A person who wishes to serve as a delegate or alternate must have fulfilled the requirement of Party affiliation at the time of election. For the purposes of participation in a convention, a person’s residence as indicated by their current voter registration certificate or electronic records provided by their county voter registrar, is determinative. A person’s residence for the purpose of conventions in a particular year is fixed as of the date of the General Primary Election, even if the person subsequently moves to a different precinct or district. A Precinct Chairman, or person acting in his stead, who convenes the Precinct Convention earlier than the hour determined by the County Executive Committee shall be subject to challenge by any Republican General Primary voter in the precinct through the method outlined in Rule No. 27; and if the challenge is upheld by the County or Senatorial District Convention, such person shall be removed from serving as a delegate or alternate to any convention at any level throughout the remainder of the year. Children whose parents or guardians are participants in a precinct convention may attend the convention if space permits, but may not participate or disrupt.

Rule No. 21 – Agenda for Precinct Conventions
The agenda for each precinct convention shall include the following order of business:
a. Call to order at the appointed hour by the Precinct Chairman or other participant if the Precinct Chairman is not present.
b. Preparation of a list of and announcement of number of qualified participants present.
c. Announcement of agenda and basic rules of procedure.
d. Election of the permanent officers of the convention by majority vote.
e. Announcement of County or District Convention and of temporary committee meetings, if known.
f. Election of delegates and alternates to County or Senatorial District Convention, as the case may be, by majority vote, and certification of eligibility of each delegate and alternate by the Precinct Convention Secretary, where the primary voters list is available.
g. Resolutions.
h. Other business.
i. Adjourn.

Rule No. 22 – Chairman’s Responsibilities
a. Written or Electronic Records – The Permanent Chairman of the Precinct Convention shall be responsible for seeing that an accurate written or electronic record is prepared of all convention proceedings, including:
1. The minutes of the Precinct Convention.
2. The list of participants and their residence addresses and towns.
3. The list of delegates and alternates elected to the County or Senatorial District Convention with residence addresses and towns.
4. All resolutions, adopted or not adopted.
b. Inspection of Records – The written record shall be signed by Permanent Chairman of the Precinct Convention, and made available for inspection and additional copying by any participant in the convention for a period of thirty (30) minutes immediately following adjournment of the convention. Upon request, the Permanent Chairman shall certify any correct copy with his signature.
c. Transmittal of Records – The Permanent Chairman of the Precinct Convention shall safely transmit to the County Chairman the written or electronic record of all convention proceedings, and one (1) copy of the same. Transmittal may be:
1. Electronic, delivered to the County Chairman’s electronic mail address or other website designated by the County Chairman for this purpose, not later than the third (3rd) day after the date of the Precinct Convention if not held on the same day or day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention. If the Precinct Convention is held on the same day or the day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention, the Permanent Chairman shall deliver the record within thirty (30) minutes of adjournment of the Precinct Convention.
2. By mail, deposited in the mail not later than the second (2nd) day after the date of the Precinct Convention if not held on the same day or day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention, or
3. In person, delivered not later than the third (3rd) day after the date of the Precinct Convention if not held on the same day or day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention. If the Precinct Convention is held on the same day or the day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention, the Permanent Chairman shall deliver the record within thirty (30) minutes of adjournment of the Precinct Convention.
In counties that do not hold Precinct Conventions on the same day or day immediately preceding the County or Senatorial District Convention, and contain multiple Senatorial Districts, the County Chairman shall deliver the original records of each Precinct Convention to the Temporary Chairmen of the Senatorial District Conventions not later than the sixth (6th) day after the date of the Precinct Convention. The County Chairman shall deliver any records subsequently received from a Precinct Convention within two (2) business days after receipt.
d. Preservation of Records – The Permanent Chairman of the Precinct Convention shall preserve a copy of the written or electronic record, which is not a public record, until the end of the voting year.
The County Chairman shall preserve a paper or electronic copy of the written records of each Precinct Convention until the end of the voting year. The copies are a public record, and shall be available for inspection. The County Chairman shall schedule a reasonable time and place for review of the records to occur within seven (7) days of receipt of a written request.

GENERAL RULES FOR COUNTY, SENATORIAL, DISTRICT AND STATE CONVENTIONS

Rule No. 23 – Convention Resolutions
At any convention other than a Precinct Convention, all resolutions including those offered by delegates for consideration by the Convention shall be filed with the Secretary of the Convention not later than thirty (30) minutes after the Permanent Committee on Platform and Resolutions is appointed and shall automatically and without debate be referred by the Secretary of the Convention to the Committee on Platform and Resolutions or other committee appropriate to the subject for consideration and report. The Secretary of the Convention shall remain available in a publicly announced location easily accessible from the convention floor during the period in which such resolutions can be filed. All resolutions adopted by the next lower level convention shall be considered by the Temporary Platform and Resolutions committee of the next higher level convention. A temporary or permanent resolutions committee may originate resolutions.

Rule No. 23A – Delegate Allocations and Entitlements
a. The delegate and alternate entitlements to the County or Senatorial District and State Conventions shall be based on the number of votes cast for the Party’s gubernatorial candidate in the most recent gubernatorial general election.
1. Each precinct convention shall be entitled to elect one delegate and one alternate to the County or Senatorial District Convention based on a ratio of one (1) for each twenty-five (25) votes and major fraction thereof within the boundaries of the voting precinct and further show in more detail on the following table provided that any Precinct Convention shall be entitled to elect at least one (1) delegate and one (1) alternate:
Votes Delegates Alternates
0-37 1 1
38-62 2 2
63-87 3 3
88-112 4 4
113-137 5 5
etc. etc. etc.

2. Each County or Senatorial District Convention shall be entitled to elect one (1) delegate and one (1) alternate to the State Convention based on a ratio of one (1) for each 300 votes and major fraction thereof within the boundaries of the County or Senatorial District and further shown in more detail on the following table provided that any County or Senatorial District Convention shall be entitled to elect at least two (2) delegates and two (2) alternates:
Votes Delegates Alternates
0-750 2 2
751-1050 3 3
1051-1350 4 4
1351-1650 5 5
etc. etc. etc.

3. Each Precinct and County/Senatorial District Convention delegate and alternate delegate entitlement to the State Convention shall be increased or decreased proportionately among all delegations to achieve a State Convention potential delegate and alternate delegate roll of no less than 7,500 delegates and 7,500 alternate delegates and no more than 9,000 delegates and 9,000 alternate delegates to the State Convention.
b. At the option of the local County or Senatorial District Executive Committee and by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of said committee at the statutory meeting required pursuant to the TEC Section 172.082, the delegate entitlement may be changed to a ratio of one (1) to forty (40) and major fraction thereof, or any ratio in between, for that year only if said committee can justify among their peers that it is impractical due to size or availability of space to use the formula permitting the maximum number.
b. At the option of the local County Executive Committee (in counties containing only one Senate District),or Senatorial District Executive Committee (in a district comprising only a part of a single county), or the precinct chairs of the precincts residing in a particular senatorial district (for a county that is only partly situated in a senatorial district) by a two-thirds (2/3) vote of said committee at the statutory meeting required pursuant to the T.E.C. Section 172.082, held no later than the date specified in the Texas Election Code for the required drawing for a place on the general primary ballot, the delegate entitlement may be changed to a ratio of one (1) to forty (40) and major fraction thereof, or any ratio in between one (1) to twenty-five (25) and one (1) to forty (40), for that year only if said committee can justify among their peers that it is impractical due to size or availability of space to use the formula permitting the maximum number.
c.
c. The delegate and alternate entitlement in a presidential election year for a County or Senatorial District Convention which includes more than one (1) Congressional District shall be apportioned among the Congressional Districts in the same manner they are apportioned to the County or Senatorial Districts, provided that the total delegate and alternate entitlement from the County or Senatorial District does not exceed that provided for in this Rule. If the calculation of delegate and alternate entitlements by Congressional District are different from the calculation of delegate and alternate entitlements by County or Senatorial District, the following guide¬lines shall be used in adjusting the total delegate/alternate entitlements:
1. The delegate and alternate totals shall not be greater than the delegate/al¬ternate calculation for the County or Senatorial District except that any Congres¬sional District shall be entitled to elect at least one (1) delegate and one (1) alternate which may cause the delegate/alternate entitlement for a County or Senatorial District to exceed the total entitlement for the County or Senatorial District by the number of delegates and alternates from one (1) or more Congressional Districts with less than enough votes to get an entitlement of greater than one (1) pursuant to section a of this Rule, in a presidential election year;
2. Except as provided in subsection 1 above, if the calculation for del¬egates and alternates by Congressional District should exceed the number of delegates and alternates by Senatorial District, then the delegate and alternate entitlement to the Congressional District shall be reduced beginning with the smallest fraction, then contin¬uing to the next higher fraction until the calculations are equal;
3. If the calculation for delegates and alternates by Senatorial District should exceed the number of delegates and alternates by Congressional District, then the delegate and alternate entitlement to the Congressional District shall be increased begin¬ning with the highest fraction, then continuing to the next lower fraction until the calcu¬lations are equal;
4. In a presidential election year, each delegate and each alternate shall have credentials for both the Senatorial District and the Congressional District Caucuses and if a delegate or alternate is not credentialed for both, the delegate or alternate shall not be credentialed for either.
d. In the event of boundary changes among precincts or districts, or the creation or deletion of precincts or districts since the most recent gubernatorial election, the following rules shall govern the allocation of gubernatorial votes to the changed or newly created precincts or districts.
1. The apportionment of gubernatorial votes to the newly created or changed precincts or districts shall be made using any fair and equitable method for making such determination.
2. The County Executive Committee shall apportion to each precinct the number of votes to be used in allocating the number of delegates and alternates which may be elected by such precincts using any fair and equitable method for making the determination.
3. When the boundaries of a Senatorial District or Congressional District have changed or a new district formed causing a boundary change in an election precinct, the apportionment of gubernatorial votes to each precinct shall be used in allocating the number of delegates to be elected in each affected district.
4. If the County Executive Committee fails to act before the first (1st) day of candidate filing for a place on the General Primary ballot for public office, the SREC shall make such apportionment of the gubernatorial vote to precincts.

Rule No. 24 – Minority Reports of Committees
At any convention other than a Precinct Convention, a minority report of a committee, shall be presented to the Convention, if a committee member has notified the committee chairman of the intent to file a minority report before the committee adjourns, and if it has been reduced to writing and signed by not less than two (2) or twenty percent (20%) of the members of such committee, whichever is greater, and presented to the chairman of the committee or the convention secretary no longer than 30 minutes after the committee adjourns. The committee member who presents the minority report to the Convention shall be permitted to move the implementing motion.

Rule No. 25 – Persons Admitted and Who May Address
a. Admittance – At any convention other than a Precinct Convention, there shall be admitted to the convention floor only delegates whose names are listed on the temporary roll during the temporary organization or on the permanent roll when adopted by the Convention, past State Chairmen and Vice Chairmen, the present members of the SREC, its officers and employees, the National Committeeman and Committeewoman, past National Committeemen and Committeewomen, properly accredited members of the media, babies of nursing mothers who are delegates, Republican public officeholders, Republican candidates for public office, and persons assisting delegates that have physical disabilities.
b. Badges – The Secretary of the Convention is instructed to issue identification badges in accordance with the above, and the Sergeant-at-Arms and his assistants shall admit only authorized persons to the convention floor. Seating shall be provided for alternates in the section(s) designated for guests.
c. Addressing Convention – At any convention other than a Precinct Convention, no person other than a Republican Party of Texas official, member of the SREC, or delegate shall address the Convention or Caucus of the convention without the permission of the Chairman or the general consent of the Convention or Caucus of the convention.
d. At any convention, registration and credentialing shall continue through adjournment.

Rule No. 26 – Seating of Alternates
At any convention other than a Precinct Convention.
a. Order of Seating Alternates – Alternates shall be seated for absent delegates in the order listed in the minutes of the convention electing them; however, if instructions are provided by the Convention electing such alternates, said instructions shall be followed in the seating of alternates.
b. Voting in Caucuses – Alternates shall be admitted to all district or precinct caucuses; however, they shall not vote or be provided any privileges of a delegate unless seated for an absent delegate.
c. Limitations on Using Alternates – Alternates shall replace delegates absent from the voting floor only from the same convention electing such alternates.
d. Timing of Seating – Alternates may be seated to replace absent delegates at any time in a convention by the chairman of a delegation and seated alternates shall relinquish their seat upon the return to the floor by the delegate except that:
1. Alternates shall be seated to replace delegates absent from the voting floor prior to the beginning of any vote and shall not be seated or unseated during any vote.
2. In caucuses, alternates shall be seated to replace delegates absent from the voting floor prior to roll call of the caucus or delegation of the caucus and shall not be seated or unseated during the roll call of the caucus or delegation of the caucus.
3. Alternates under challenge pursuant to Rule No. 27 shall not be seated until the challenge is resolved.

Rule No. 27 – Challenges to Credentials of Delegates
a. County or Senatorial District Conventions. The credentials of any delegate or alternate to a County or Senatorial District Convention may be challenged by any person who voted in the Republican General Primary and resides in the same precinct as the delegate he wishes to challenge by mailing to the County or District Convention Chairman a written challenge specifying the grounds for the challenge and detailing the specific Rule or Rules alleged to have been violated. The challenge shall be sent via certified or registered mail at least three (3) days before the date of the convention. A copy of this challenge shall be certified or registered mailed by the person initiating the challenge to the challenged delegate(s) or alternate(s). The County or District Convention Chairman shall send all challenges to the chairman of the Temporary Committee on Credentials of the convention in question.
b. State Convention.
1. Filing of Challenge. The credentials of any delegate or alternate to the State Convention may be challenged by any person who voted in the Republican General Primary and who resides in the same County and Senatorial District as the delegate or alternate he wishes to challenge by sending to the State Chairman and to the delegate(s) or alternate(s) to whom such challenge relates a written challenge specifying the grounds for the challenge and detailing the specific Rule or Rules alleged to have been violated. A challenge must include the Rule number alleged to have been violated and the specific facts supporting the challenge based on a violation of that Rule. A challenge must also identify any allegations of fact and identify those alleged facts not personally known to the complainant. A challenge should use simple, concise, and direct statements. The challenge shall be sent via certified return receipt or registered mail no later than thirty (30) days following the date of the county or Senatorial District Convention. The State Chairman shall deliver all such challenges to the Republican State Officials Committee of the SREC (as constituted in the bylaws of the SREC, Article VI, Section 8 ). The names of the members of the SREC Officials Committee shall be posted on the website of the Republican Party of Texas.
2. State Officials Committee. Without attempting to assess merit or lack of merit, the Officials Committee shall in open session without taking testimony conduct a preliminary review of each challenge in order to establish whether the basis for the challenge is valid under the Rules of the Republican Party of Texas. Both the person filing a challenge and the delegate or alternate challenged shall be notified of the date and time of the Officials Committee meeting in which the challenge is heard. The Officials Committee shall forward to the Temporary Committee on Credentials all challenges meeting the requirements alleging violations of Party Rules at a county or senatorial district convention unless the Officials Committee determines the basis of the challenge to be frivolous, i.e. irrelevant or lacking in substance. with regard to form, content, and procedure. Any challenge not meeting these requirements deemed frivolous shall not be forwarded to the Temporary Committee on Credentials, and the principal(s) who brought such challenge and the principal(s) against whom the challenge was brought shall be promptly notified by certified with return receipt or registered mail. The Credentials Committee shall not hear a late challenge of a delegate or alternate.
3. Appeal. A decision of the Officials Committee may be appealed by either party to the Temporary Committee on Credentials by mailing of appeal via certified with return receipt or registered mail notice to the Credentials Committee Chairman and to the principal(s) named in the challenge no later than ten (10) days prior to the date that the State Convention holds its first (1st) general session.
c.d. Status of Challenged Delegate. No delegate whose credentials are challenged shall lose his eligibility to serve on a temporary committee, although he may not vote in the Credentials Committee on his own challenge.
d.e. Committee on Credentials Procedure. At any convention other than a precinct convention, the Temporary Committee on Credentials, when it convenes, shall hear both sides of the challenge and shall report to the Convention the names of the delegates or alternates whom it believes are entitled to participate in the convention. The Convention shall vote on the report of the Committee on Credentials on each challenge that is made. Challenged delegates shall be listed on the Temporary Roll, but may not vote on their own challenge. Furthermore, delegates from delegations that are being challenged may not be seated until the challenge is resolved.

Rule No. 27A – Date, Time and Place for County and Senatorial District Conventions (Permanent State Executive Committee Rule)
County and Senatorial District Conventions shall be held on the third Saturday after general primary election day. However, if that date occurs during Passover or on the day following Good Friday, the conventions shall be held on the next Saturday that does not occur during Passover or on the day following Good Friday. The County Executive Committee in each county shall set the hour and place for convening County and Senatorial District Conventions in that county.
Rule No. 28 – Conventions in County with Multiple Senatorial Districts
If a county is situated in more than one state Senatorial District, instead of a County Convention, a Senatorial District Convention shall be held in each part of the county that is situated in a different Senatorial District, provided, however, that shared facilities may be utilized for separate Senatorial District Conventions that may be held outside the geographical boundaries of the Senatorial District, if party interests and public accessibility will be served as determined by a caucus of precinct chairmen in each affected Senatorial District within the county no later than the date on which drawing for a position on the primary ballot is conducted. A meeting for this purpose shall have been called by written notice to each precinct chairman in each respective Senatorial District within the county from the County Chairman, post-marked no later than ten (10) days prior to the meeting.
Rule No. 29 – County/Senatorial Convention Committees
A. Prior to each County or Senatorial District Convention, the Temporary Chairman shall appoint the following committees, and name the chairmen thereof, provided that all members shall be delegates and if the convention has more than fifty (50) delegates, each such committee shall be composed of at least five (5) and not more than fifteen (15) delegates. The committees and their duties shall be as follows:
1. Credentials: This committee shall hear any contest concerning delegates and shall recommend the Permanent Roll of the Convention.
2. Rules: This committee shall recommend the Supplementary Rules for the Convention.
3. Permanent Organization: This committee shall recommend permanent officers of the convention from among the delegates present.
4. Resolutions: This committee shall conduct preliminary deliberations for the purpose of making recommendations to the Permanent Resolutions Committee.
5. Nominations: This committee shall conduct preliminary deliberations for the purpose of making recommendations to the Permanent Nominations Committee.
B. The Temporary Convention Chairman shall make available at the Chairman’s podium at the start of the convention, no fewer than five (5) copies of the Temporary Rules Committee report and no fewer than five (5) copies of the Temporary Resolutions Committee report, and announce they may be inspected by any delegate or alternate to the convention.
C. Immediately upon the election of the Permanent Chairman, the Permanent Chairman shall appoint the following Permanent Committees from among the delegates, whose duties shall be as stated below, and the chairmen thereof, provided that if the convention has more than twenty-five (25) delegates, each such committee shall be composed of at least five (5) and not more than fifteen (15) delegates. The committees and their duties shall be as follows:
1. Nominations: This committee shall present nominations for delegates and alternates to the State Convention, after considering the recommendations of the Temporary Nominations Committee.
2. Resolutions: This committee shall recommend resolutions to the Convention, after considering the recommendations of the Temporary Resolutions Committee.]

Rule No. 30 – County/Senatorial Convention Agenda
The agenda for each County or Senatorial District Convention shall include the following order of business.
a. Call to order by the [Temporary] Chairman.
b. Roll call of temporary roll of delegates. (Roll call may be taken by name or by Precinct Delegation count. The delegate registration list may be used at the start of the convention to establish the temporary roll and a quorum for the convention, when approved by a majority voice vote of the delegates present. Delegates must provide proper identification upon registration to obtain their credentials, if this method is to be used.) At conclusion of roll call the Secretary shall announce:
1. the number of delegations present;
2. the combined voting strength of those delegations; and
3. the number of attending delegates at start of convention.
c. Report of the Credentials Committee (this report shall be acted on prior to any further business.)
d. Report of the Rules Committee; adoption of supplemental rules.
e. Report of the Permanent Organization Committee; election of permanent officers from among the delegates.
f. Appointment of Permanent Nominations and Permanent Resolutions Committees.
g. Precinct Caucuses, if applicable.
h. Report of the Resolutions Nominations Committee; adoption of resolutions nominations.
i. Report of the Nominations Resolutions Committee; adoption of nominations resolutions.
j. Other business.
k. Adjourn.
Provided, however, that such order of business, following item (c) may be changed by affirmative vote of two-thirds (2/3) of the delegates present and voting.

Rule No. 31 – Report of Nominations Committee
At a County or Senatorial District Convention, the Committee on Nominations shall present a report including a list of delegates and alternates for election to the State Convention and the Nominations Committee shall designate the manner in which alternates shall replace absent delegates. That report may be amended by the Convention by the process of adding, or by striking and inserting, or by substitution. The Convention shall then elect the delegates and alternates to the State Convention by adopting the report, or the report as amended, of the Nominations Committee. All delegates and alternates may be elected at-large, or some or all may be allocated to precincts, at the discretion of the Convention, as provided in the Convention’s supplemental rules.. In the absence of provisions in supplemental rules, all delegates and alternates will be elected at large.

Rule No. 32 – Certified List of Delegates
Delegates and alternates to the Republican State Convention shall be made aware, at the time they submit their names, that any contact information provided may be disclosed in accordance with the following:
a. The Permanent Chairman of a County or Senatorial District Convention shall be responsible for making a certified list of the delegates and alternates chosen, with residence addresses including towns shown thereon, phone number (if available), and email address (if available), together with a copy of all resolutions adopted by the Convention, and shall sign the same, the Permanent Secretary of such convention attesting his signature; and within five (5) days after the convention shall forward such certified lists, and resolutions to the State Chairman at the Republican Party of Texas State Headquarters. The lists, resolutions, and other records of the convention only to the extent required by law shall be made available by the Permanent Chairman for inspection and copying during office hours, at a charge not to exceed $1.00 per page, . , or by electronic means when such method is available at a charge not to exceed $10.00.
b. Any compilation of delegate and alternate information prepared by the Republican Party of Texas shall not be treated as a public record. However, subject to appropriate proprietary agreements, said compilation shall be made available to any then current delegate or alternate of the Republican State Convention or any Republican officeholder or candidate for Party or public office or Party County Chairman at a charge not to exceed $25.00 per 1,000 delegates and alternates provided. Said information and its updates shall be made available at the earliest practical date and initially no later than five (5) weeks from the date of the last County or Senatorial District Convention. Said information, once available, shall be provided to a qualified requestor within no more than seven (7) business days of the receipt by the Republican Party of Texas State Headquarters of the order form and payment.

GENERAL RULES FOR STATE CONVENTIONS

Rule No. 33 – Temporary Organization
A. Date, Time, Place and Call. The SREC shall select the date, time and place of the State Convention, and the State Chairman shall include this information along with the date and place of temporary committee meetings in the call to the convention, which shall be mailed at least ten (10) days prior to the Convention to each delegate and alternate on the temporary roll. The State Chairman shall recommend the temporary convention agenda and order of business to the SREC.
A. Date, Time, Place and Call. The SREC shall select the date, time and place of the State Convention, and the State Chairman shall include this information along with the date and place of temporary committee meetings in the call to the convention, which shall be posted on the website of the Republican Party of Texas (http://www.texasgop.org) mailed at least thirty (30) days prior to the Convention. The State Chairman shall send the call via electronic mail to each delegate and alternate on the temporary roll who has a valid email address on file with the Republican Party of Texas. All delegates and alternates who do not have a valid email address on file shall be mailed a copy of the call not less than fifteen (15) days prior to the convention. The State Chairman shall recommend the temporary convention agenda and order of business to the SREC.
B.
B.C. Temporary Committees. Within twenty (20) days following the County/Senatorial District Conventions, the two (2) SREC members representing each Senatorial District, either separately or jointly, shall recommend to the State Chairman one (1) representative from among their district’s delegates to each of the State Convention temporary committees. The State Chairman shall appoint one (1) delegate from each Senatorial District to each of these committees from among these recommendations timely submitted, or of his own choosing if no names were submitted, or none were eligible or willing to serve.
In addition to these members, the State Chairman shall appoint the Chairman for each temporary committee. These lists of members and Chairmen, including contact information, shall be posted to the Republican Party of Texas’ website within thirty (30) days following the County/Senatorial District Conventions. Said list(s) will be dated and updated as new/corrected information is obtained. The temporary committees are:
1. Credentials: This committee shall hear any contests concerning delegates and alternates which were not filed as challenges and shall recommend the resolution of such contests, plus the temporary roll about which there is no contest, to the SREC. Additionally, this committee shall hear all challenges forwarded to it by the State Officials Committee, plus any challenge under appeal, and shall recommend the resolution thereof to the State Convention. Upon resolution by the State Convention of any challenges under this appeal process, this committee shall recommend the permanent roll to the State Convention.
2. Organization: This committee shall recommend the temporary organization of the convention to the SREC. The State Chairman shall be the Temporary Chairman of the Biennial State Convention. The officers of each State Convention shall include a registered parliamentarian, appointed by the State Chairman. This committee shall also recommend the permanent organization to the State Convention after the State Convention’s adoption of the permanent roll. The election of a permanent convention chairman shall not be in order until a majority of those delegates elected at county or senatorial district conventions have registered in attendance at the state convention. For the purposes of this section, alternates seated as delegates shall be counted as delegates.
3. Rules: This committee shall recommend the Supplementary Rules for the Convention to the SREC and may recommend changes in these General Rules to the Permanent Committee on Rules.
4. Platform and Resolutions: This committee shall conduct the preliminary deliberations for the purpose of making recommendations to the Permanent Committee on Platform and Resolutions.
C. SREC Pre-convention Meeting. Prior to the convention, the SREC shall approve the following:
1. The Temporary Roll of the Convention, excluding those challenges, if any, to be resolved by the Convention as provided in Rule No. 27.
2. The temporary Supplementary Rules of the Convention, which together with these General Rules shall be the Temporary Rules of the Convention.
3. The temporary agenda and order of business of the convention.
4. The temporary organization of the convention.
D. Temporary Caucus Chairman. Prior to each State Convention in Presidential election years the State Chairman shall appoint the Temporary Chairman of each Congressional District Caucus. Prior to each State Convention, the two (2) members from each Senatorial District of the SREC shall appoint one (1) representative from among their Senatorial District’s delegates to be the Temporary Chairman in Senatorial District Caucus; provided, however, that if requested in writing by Senatorial District Convention resolution, the State Chairman shall appoint the Permanent Chairman of the last Senatorial District Convention for those Senatorial Districts which lie solely within one (1) county, unless the Permanent Chairman is unable or unwilling to serve. If the two (2) SREC members cannot agree on a selection, then each shall submit a name to the State Chairman, who will select one (1) of the names submitted. If any appointed delegate is unable to serve, the State Chairman may appoint a replacement.

Rule No. 34 – Permanent Committees and Composition
At each Biennial State Convention, the membership of each permanent committee listed below shall be composed of one (1) delegate from each Senatorial District, to be elected by caucus of the delegates in each such district, plus the Chairman thereof, to be appointed by the State Chairman. If there is a temporary committee specified in these Rules corresponding to a permanent committee in this Rule, the scope of the permanent committee is not limited to what was considered by, voted upon, or recommended by the temporary committee counterpart.
Such permanent committees shall be as follows:
a. Credentials: This committee shall continue to add registered delegates and alternates to the permanent roll throughout the convention.
b. Rules and Order of Business: This committee shall recommend to the Convention the Supplementary Rules of the Convention, any amendments to these General Rules, and the Order of Business.
c. Platform and Resolutions: This committee shall recommend to the Convention the platform (if applicable) and the resolutions.
d. State Nominations: This committee shall report to the Convention nominations for the state positions to be filled by the Convention.

Rule No. 34A – National Nominations Committee
At the Biennial State Convention in presidential election years, there shall also be a permanent National Nominations Committee composed of one (1) delegate from each Congressional District, to be elected by caucus of the delegates in each such district, plus the chairman thereof, to be appointed by the State Chairman. The Chairman of the permanent National Nominations Committee shall convene the meeting of the committee two (2) hours after the start of the Congressional Caucus with a quorum being present. This committee shall report to the Convention nominations for National Delegates and Alternates, Presidential Electors, and National Committeeman and National Committeewoman, which nominations have previously been made in accordance with Rule Nos. 39 and 40, and sections 6 and 7 of Rule No. 38.

Rule No. 35 – Temporary Committee on Credentials – Contest
At a State Convention, any delegate or alternate who has filed a challenge or who has been challenged including delegates and alternates whose names are not listed on the Temporary Roll of the Convention, but are listed on County or Senatorial District Convention Minutes and Returns filed with the State Chairman shall be allowed admittance to the room in which the Temporary Committee on Credentials holds its meetings for the purpose of presenting a contest and may speak to the merits of their case within the time limits established by the committee. The contestants from only one (1) County or Senatorial District shall be admitted at one (1) time. Any contest will be reported by the Credentials Committee to the SREC, with a recommendation as to its resolution, and the decision of the SREC will be final in determining its effect on the Temporary Roll of the Convention. If the contest is filed as a challenge, in accordance with provisions of Rule No. 27, the issue will be presented by the Credentials Committee with a recommendation for its resolution, to the full Convention for final determination.

Rule No. 36 – Seating and Voting/State Conventions
Seating and voting at the Biennial State Convention shall be by Congressional District or Senatorial District as appropriate.

Rule No. 37 – Is intentionally blank.

Rule No. 38 – National Convention Delegates and Alternates
Section 1. Presidential Primary, Application of Rule
a. Presidential Primary: A Presidential Primary election shall be conducted by the Republican Party in the year 1980 and every fourth year thereafter in conjunction with the Party’s General Primary Election for the purpose of permitting the qualified voters of Texas to express their respective preferences as to the nominee of the Republican Party to the office of President of the United States.
b. Application of Rule: Such Presidential Primary shall be held, and the delegates and alternates to the National Convention for that year shall be selected and elected, in the manner and at the times set forth in this Rule.

Section 2. Method of Qualifying as Presidential Candidate
a. Filing: Any person eligible to hold the office of President of the United States may qualify to participate as a Presidential candidate in the presidential primary by filing with the State Chairman, not later than the date and time specified for the general primary election ballot filing deadline in Section 172.023(a), Texas Election Code 6:00 p.m. January 2, or the next business day thereafter, preceding the primary, a signed and acknowledged application for his or her name to be placed on the Presidential Primary ballot, accompanied by a supporting petition signed by a minimum of 300 registered voters of the state from each of a minimum of fifteen (15) Congressional Districts, or the payment of a filing fee of $5,000.
b. Signing Petition: A voter may sign only one (1) petition supporting one (1) candidate for President and may sign that petition only one (1) time. The name of any voter violating this provision shall be stricken from all petitions signed by that voter and shall not be counted for any purpose.
c. Form of Petition: The SREC shall prescribe the form of all applications and petitions which are to be filed pursuant to this section and may by resolution provide for a method of verification of the petitions required here.
d. Withdrawal or Death of Candidate: A Presidential candidate may withdraw from participation in the Presidential Primary at any time by filing with the Secretary of the SREC a signed and acknowledged request to that effect. If a Presidential candidate dies or withdraws before the seventy-ninth (79th) sixty-second (62nd) day prior to Election Day, the name of the candidate shall not appear on the ballot. If a candidate dies or withdraws during the seventy-nine (79) sixty-two (62) days before Primary Election Day, the votes cast for that candidate shall be counted and the delegate and alternates, if any, allocable to that candidate under this Rule shall be elected by the appropriate Congressional District Caucus from any qualified persons and they shall be uncommitted delegates and alternates.
e. Replacement of Delegates of Withdrawn or Deceased Candidate: If a Presidential candidate withdraws or dies during the time between Primary Election Day and the convening of the State Convention, then any delegates and alternates to which such Presidential candidate would otherwise be entitled under this Rule shall lapse and the appropriate Congressional District Caucuses at the State Convention shall elect qualified delegates and alternates as uncommitted delegates and alternates in replacement of the delegates and alternates of such withdrawn or deceased candidate. For the purpose of this section, withdrawal shall be accomplished only by the candidate filing a signed and acknowledged request to that effect with the Secretary of the SREC.
f. Challenge to Petition: In the event of a challenge to a petition, the State Chairman shall follow the procedure for verification of signatures by means of statistical sampling as provided in Chapter 141, Sub-Chapter C, Section 141.069 of the Texas Election Code.

Section 3. The Presidential Primary Ballot
a. Listing on Ballot: The names of the qualifying Presidential candidates shall be printed on the ballot as a separate race (and as the first race if not prohibited by law) on the Party’s Official Ballot for the General Primary. The names of the candidates shall be listed in a vertical column under the heading “Preference for Presidential Nominee.” The order of appearance on the Ballot in each County shall be determined by lot in each County at a meeting of the County Executive Committee in accordance with Section 172.082, Texas Election Code.
b. Uncommitted: In addition to the ballot listing of the names of the qualifying Presidential candidates, there shall appear at the bottom of such listing of candidates on said ballot a place designated “Uncommitted” in accordance with Section 4 of this Rule.
c. Adjustment of Ballot for Various Methods of Voting: Appropriate changes shall be made in ballots for voting machines and electronic voting systems; consistent with the method of voting used.
d. Style of Names: The type for all names of qualifying Presidential candidates shall be uniform and of the same size and the SREC shall prescribe a sample ballot and the State Chairman shall furnish a copy of the sample ballot to each County Chairman at the time prescribed by the Election Code for certifying the names to appear on the ballot.
e. Write-in Prohibited: Write-in voting for presidential candidates shall not be permitted, and any write-in votes shall not be counted for any purpose.

Section 4. Uncommitted Delegates and Alternates
In addition to the foregoing, uncommitted delegates and alternates may be elected as follows:
a. District Delegates: In those Congressional Districts entitled to uncommitted delegates and alternates under this Rule, the Congressional District Caucus convened at the State Convention shall elect and submit to the Convention for confirmation, in like manner with other delegates and alternates, the name(s) and appropriate number of qualified voters who reside in the district and who voted in the Republican Presidential Primary and who sign a pledge declaring themselves uncommitted at the time of their election as uncommitted district delegates and alternates to the National Convention, and such persons shall be confirmed by the Convention as uncommitted district delegates and alternates.
b. Delegate Entitlement: For the purpose of determining entitlements under sections 8 and 9 of this Rule, votes cast for “Uncommitted” on the ballot shall be considered as having been voted for a separate candidate.
c. At Large Delegates: In the event a canvass of the Republican Presidential Primary vote on a state-wide basis demonstrates that the voters are entitled to one or more uncommitted delegates and alternates at-large under this Rule, the National Nominations Committee, as provided for under Rule No. 34A, shall nominate and include in its report to the Convention under section 7, subsection c, the appropriate number of qualified voters of the State who voted in the Republican Presidential Primary and who sign a pledge declaring themselves uncommitted at the time of their election, as at-large and uncommitted delegates and alternates to the National Convention.

Section 5. Canvass of Returns
For the purpose of selecting district delegates and alternates, the returns of votes cast for Presidential candidates in the Republican Presidential Primary shall be canvassed by the SREC at the same time as the returns for other offices and shall be canvassed and recorded by Congressional District. For the purpose of selecting at-large delegates and alternates, the returns shall be canvassed and counted on a statewide basis.

Section 6. Election of District Delegates and Alternates at State Convention
a. Number of District Delegates and Alternates: Three (3) district delegates from each Congressional District and three (3) alternates shall be elected at the State Convention required by Section 174.092, Texas Election Code, in accordance with this section and the entitlements set forth in sections 8 and 9 hereof.
b. At the State Convention, each Congressional District shall meet and shall elect those district delegates and alternates to which a candidate is entitled under section 8. Elections for a candidate’s committed delegates and alternates shall be from person nominated from the floor at the said meeting, provided however, that said nominee agree to adhere to the pledge to the candidate required under section 10 hereof. Nominations for uncommitted delegates, if there is such an entitlement, shall be provided under section 4. Elections shall be by majority vote, one at a time, with all delegates being elected first and then all alternates. Those delegates and alternates elected by the Congressional District shall be submitted to the Convention, which shall confirm, and not amend, those district delegates and alternates who shall be the district delegates and alternates from Texas to the National Convention of the Republican Party, and shall be so certified in accordance with The Rules of the Republican Party.

Section 7. Election of At-Large Delegates and Alternates at State Convention
a. As provided for in Rule No. 34A, each Congressional District Caucus shall meet at the State Convention, and elect one (1) person to serve as a member of the National Nominations Committee from persons nominated from the floor at the said meeting. Election to this committee shall be by majority vote. In the same manner, each Congressional District Caucus may recommend the name of one (1) member for consideration by the National Nominations Committee as a National Convention delegate or alternate, but the National Nominations Committee is not required to accept such recommendation, in accordance with The Rules of the Republican Party.
b. At the State Convention, the National Nominations Committee shall meet to select nominees for all at-large delegates and alternate delegates, and consider the recommended names of members of the Congressional District Caucuses for possible selection as National Convention Delegates and Alternates. Those elected federal office holders who have access to the floor of the National Convention by virtue of their office shall be prohibited for selection as an at-large national delegate or alternate, by the National Nominations Committee.
c. Those at-large delegate and alternate nominees selected by the National Nominations committee shall be reported to the State Convention. This report shall not be amendable by the State Convention, but shall either be confirmed or rejected by the State Convention. If the report is rejected, it shall be immediately returned to the Committee for revision and then resubmitted to the State Convention, until the report is confirmed by the Convention. The at-large delegates and alternates shall also be bound by the pledge provisions of section 10 of this Rule. At-large delegates and alternates nominated and elected from Texas in accordance with this Rule shall be certified as the delegates and alternates from Texas in accordance with The Rules of the Republican Party for the National Convention.

Section 8. District Delegate and Alternate Entitlements
For the purpose of determining the entitlement to district delegates and alternates by candidates, the provisions of this section shall apply as follows:
a. More than Fifty Percent (50%) of Vote Received by Candidate: A candidate receiving more than fifty percent (50%) of the votes in any Congressional District shall be entitled to three (3) delegates and alternates from that Congressional District.
b. No Candidate Receives Majority of Vote: If no candidate receives a majority of the votes in any Congressional District the plurality winner is entitled to two (2) delegates and alternates from that district and the candidate receiving the next highest number of votes receives one (1) delegate and alternate; provided, however, that if no candidate receives a majority vote in a Congressional District, and only one candidate receives more than 20% of the Congressional District vote, such candidate shall be entitled to two delegates and alternates. The remaining Congressional District delegate and alternate shall be awarded to the second (2nd) place candidate.
b. the plurality winner receives more than twenty percent (20%) and the number of votes received by the next highest candidate is less than twenty percent (20%), the plurality winner is entitled to three (3) delegates and alternates.
c. No Candidate Receives Twenty Percent (20%) of Vote: If no candidate receives more than twenty percent (20%), each of the three (3) candidates receiving the highest number of votes shall receive one (1) delegate and alternate.

Section 9. At-Large Delegate and Alternate Entitlements
For the purpose of determining the entitlement to at-large delegates and alternates by candidates, the provisions of this section shall apply, as follows:
a. At-Large Delegates and Alternates Allocated by State Convention Caucus: The delegates elected to participate in the State Convention shall caucus by secret ballot and select a presidential candidate by majority vote to receive the entitlement of a number of at-large delegates and alternates that will represent 25% (rounded down) of the total number of Texas delegates (excluding the State Chairman, Republican National Committeeman, and Republican National Committeewoman) and alternates to the Republican National Convention. The State Republican Executive Committee shall prescribe the process for each state convention delegate to cast their vote for their presidential preference by electronic or paper ballot. The National Nominations Committee shall canvass the vote and allocate the State Convention Caucus selection from among the at-large delegates prior to allocating the remaining at-large delegates as follows:
b. At-Large Delegates and Alternates Allocated by Presidential Primary:

a.c. More than Fifty Percent (50%) of Vote Received by Candidate: A candidate receiving more than fifty percent (50%) of the votes cast in the Presidential Primary canvassed on a statewide basis shall be entitled to all remaining at-large delegates and alternates allocated to Texas under The Rules of the Republican Party.
b.d. No Candidate Receives Majority of Vote: If no candidate receives a majority of the votes cast statewide in the Presidential Primary, then the remaining at-large delegates and alternates shall be apportioned among the candidates receiving more than twenty percent (20%) of the statewide vote in the ratio which the number of votes received by each such candidate who received more than twenty percent (20%) of the statewide vote, bears to the total of all such candidates receiving more than twenty percent (20%) of the statewide vote, rounding fractional delegates and alternates upward to the next whole number beginning with the candidate receiving the largest number of votes. However, if no candidate receives a majority of the votes cast statewide in the Presidential Primary, and only one candidate receives 20% or more of the statewide vote, then the remaining at-large delegates and alternates shall be apportioned among the candidate receiving more than twenty percent (20%) of the statewide vote and the candidate receiving the second highest number of votes, in the ratio which the number of votes received by each such candidate, bears to the total of all such candidates, rounding fractional delegates and alternates upward to the next whole number beginning with the candidate receiving the largest number of votes.
c.e. No Candidate Receives Twenty Percent (20%) of Vote: If no candidate receives more than twenty percent (20%), the remaining at-large delegates and alternates shall be apportioned among such candidates, beginning with the candidate receiving the highest number of votes and rounding fractional delegates and alternates upward to the next whole number, and then awarding delegates and alternates to the second highest candidate in the same manner, and so forth until the remaining at large delegates and alternates to be apportioned have been fully awarded.

Section 10. Pledge of Delegates and Alternates.
a. Commitment to Candidate: By assenting to nomination on a Presidential candidate’s slate, each delegate and alternate representing a Presidential candidate becomes pledged to the Presidential candidate on whose slate the delegate and alternate is nominated in accordance with subsection b of this section.
b. Length of Commitment: A person who is elected as a delegate or alternate to the National Convention on the slate of a Presidential candidate by the State Convention to represent that particular Presidential candidate at the National Convention and who does not resign from the position is pledged to support that Presidential candidate at the National Convention until the candidate is nominated or until the delegate or alternate is released from the pledges as follows:
1. First (1st) nomination convention ballot: delegate or alternate shall be released from the pledge only in the event of death, withdrawal, or by decision of the candidate. For the first ballot taken at the National Convention to determine the nominee of the Republican Party for the office of President of the United States, the totals of the votes of the members of the Texas delegation shall be announced as assigned in accordance with these Rules. No poll of the members of the delegation, except those delegates who are uncommitted, shall be taken for the announcement of the vote.
2. Second (2nd ) nominating convention ballot: delegate or alternate shall be released from the pledge if the candidate has failed to receive twenty percent (20%) or more of the total vote cast on the preceding ballot; or by the decision of the candidate;
3. Third (3rd) and subsequent nominating convention ballots: delegates and alternates are released from any pledge.
c. Uncommitted Delegates: Uncommitted delegates and alternates may vote as they choose on all questions and candidates presented at the National Convention.

Section 11. Delegate/Alternate Resignation
a. Written Notice: Any delegate or alternate may resign by giving written notice to the Delegation Chairman and the State Chairman at any time before the date of the National Convention.
b. Filling Vacancy: Should a vacancy occur in the at-large delegation after the date of the State Convention but prior to the convening of the National Convention, the Chairman of the National Nomination Committee of the State Convention shall fill such vacancy by appointing, in writing, any at-large alternate to fill any at-large delegate position. To fill the vacancy of an at-large alternate, the said Chairman may select any person eligible under this Rule to hold said position, inasmuch as possible under The Rules of the Republican Party. In the case of a vacancy in a district delegate position, the paired alternate shall be moved over, and the presidential candidate or his/her designated representative shall appoint a new alternate, with the condition that the person so appointed shall reside in the same Congressional District at the time of appointment as the Congressional District in which the vacancy occurred. In the case of a vacancy in a district alternate position, the presidential candidate or his/her designated representative shall appoint a new alternate, with the condition that the person so appointed shall reside in the same Congressional District at the time of appointment as the Congressional District in which the vacancy occurred. All appointments shall be made from those nominated at the convention, if possible. If no potential nominee exists, then the presidential candidate or his/her designated representative shall appoint as a new alternate anyone eligible under this Rule to hold said position, provided that said nominee(s) agree to adhere to pledge to the candidate required under section 10 hereof.

Section 12. Delegate/Alternate Qualifications
Each nominee for delegate and alternate must have voted in the Republican Presidential Primary, and must be qualified to be a delegate or alternate under The Rules of the Republican Party.

Rule No. 39 – Presidential Electors
At the Biennial State Convention in presidential election years, the delegates from each Congressional District shall nominate one (1) Presidential Elector and such nomination shall be presented to the National Nominations Committee; additionally, the National Nominations Committee shall select additional nominees to bring to total number of nominees to the number allowed by law. Each such nominee for Presidential Elector, prior to the report of the National Nominations Committee, shall file with the Chairman of the National Nominations Committee an affidavit in writing as to his commitment to vote for the Republican Party’s nominees for President and Vice President. The report of the National Nominations Committee shall include only nominees who have so filed such affidavit. The report of the National Nominations Committee must include the nominees from the Congressional District who have so filed affidavits. The Convention shall then elect the Presidential Electors. Any vacancy among the Presidential Electors shall be filled by majority vote of the SREC, with the conditions that (1) the person elected to fill the vacancy shall have already filed with the State Chairman an affidavit in writing as to his commitment to vote for the Republican Party’s nominees for President and Vice President and (2) if the vacancy occurs for a person who had been nominated by his Congressional District Caucus at the Biennial State Convention then the SREC shall elect a person who has filed such an affidavit, has made an affiliation with the Republican Party of Texas under Chapter 162 of the Texas Election Code, and resides in that same congressional district at the time he is elected by the SREC to be a replacement Presidential Elector.

Rule No. 40 – National Committeeman and Committeewoman
At the Biennial State Convention held in presidential election years, each Congressional District shall caucus and recommend a man for Republican National Committeeman from Texas and a woman for Republican National Committeewoman from Texas. These recommendations shall be forwarded to the National Nominations Committee by the district’s member to the committee, who shall support them on at least the first (1st) round of voting. The National Nominations Committee shall select one (1) man and one (1) woman from these recommendations to be submitted to the Convention as nominees for these positions. Nominations from the floor shall be allowed only for candidates recommended by at least three (3) districts, or by petition signed by delegates equal in number to at least twenty percent (20%) of the convention voting strength.
In the event of a vacancy in the office of National Committeeman or Committeewoman the vacancy shall be filled by a majority vote of the State Republican Executive Committee to serve until the next biennial state convention.

Rule No. 41 – State Party Chairman and Vice Chairman
At the Biennial State Convention, each Senatorial District shall caucus and recommend a man and woman for State Chairman and Vice Chairman. These recommendations shall be forwarded to the State Nominations Committee by the district’s member to the committee, who shall support them on at least the first (1st) round of voting. The State Nominations Committee shall select one (1) man and one (1) woman from these recommendations to be submitted to the Convention as nominees for these positions. Nominations from the floor shall be allowed only for candidates recommended by at least three (3) districts, or by petition signed by delegates equal in number to at least twenty percent (20%) of the convention voting strength. No person shall be eligible to be elected Chairman or Vice Chairman for more than four (4) consecutive two-year terms to the same office.

Rule No. 42 – State Republican Executive Committee (SREC)
At the Biennial State Convention, each Senatorial District shall caucus and recommend two (2) nominees to represent that Senatorial District on the SREC as Committeeman and Committeewoman. The results shall be forwarded to the State Nominations Committee by the district’s member to the committee, and the committee shall include the results in its report to the Convention. Those members selected to represent a particular Senatorial District must be those recommended by the convention delegates representing that Senatorial District. For the purposes of election to, and service on the SREC, a person must be a resident of the district he or she represents as indicated by his or her current voter registration. No person shall be eligible to be elected State Republican Executive Committee man or woman for more than four (4) consecutive two-year terms. The SREC shall be authorized to approve the minutes of the State Convention.

GENERAL RULES FOR CANDIDATES

Rule No. 43 – Candidate Platform Review
Any Candidate running as a Republican for any public office on any ballot in the State of Texas shall be provided a copy of the Republican Party of Texas Texas Republican Party Platform by the Republican Party of Texas. The Republican Party of Texas shall make an electronic copy of the platform available to each candidate upon request. The County or State Chairman shall distribute a copy of the Republican Party of Texas Texas Republican Party Platform to each candidate along with all other candidate application papers. The Candidates, except those for judicial office, may indicate for each bullet item of the Party Principles included in the Preamble of the Republican Party of Texas Texas Republican Party Platform, whether the Candidates agrees, disagrees, or are is undecided, as to each item, with comments if desired. The County or State Chairman shall also request that each non-judicial candidate read the entire Republican Party of Texas Texas Republican Party Platform and choose at least ten (10) line items from the Texas Republican Party Platform that the candidate strongly supports. The SREC shall also have the newest platform available to the candidates within two (2) months after the adoption of the Republican Party of Texas Texas Republican Party Platform by the Republican Party of Texas Convention Delegates. Candidates for federal or state at-large non-judicial office should file the completed platform containing the candidate’s responses at the time of filing for office with the Republican Party of Texas. District and local non-judicial candidates should file the completed platform containing the candidate’s responses at the time of filing with their SREC member(s) or County Chairmen of the districts, or counties, respectively, in which they are running. The candidate’s completed platform response shall be made available by the appropriate party official for one (1) year from the date of filing at reproduction costs to any person requesting such. Candidates’ responses shall be collected and recorded by the Republican Party of Texas and published on the Republican Party of Texas website prior to the primary. A copy of the candidates’ responses filed with a county chairman shall be forwarded to the State Chairman within 10 days of receipt. At the discretion of the Officials Committee of the SREC, a candidate’s response may be excluded from or edited prior to posting to the website of the Republican Party of Texas.

Rule No. 43A
The Platform Committee of the Biennial State Convention shall prepare a list of no less than ten (10) and no more than twenty (20) principles included in the Preamble of the Texas Republican Party Platform which clearly defines the Republican Party of Texas’ values, with the knowledge and purpose that they be used to identify candidate values as stated in Rule No. 43. If a candidate does not return the candidate’s completed platform response, or fails to complete and return the Candidate Resource Committee (CRC) funding application platform questions, the candidate shall not be eligible to receive funds from the Candidate Resource Committee (CRC) of the SREC. A candidate must return the candidate’s completed platform response AND the completed Candidate Resource Committee (CRC) funding application platform questionnaire to be eligible to receive funds from the Candidate Resource Committee (CRC) of the SREC.

Republican Party of Texas 1108 Lavaca Street, Suite 500 Austin, Texas 78701 512-477-9821 (Telephone) 512-480-0709 (Fax) Revised – June 2010 Adopted by the Republican Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on March 13, 1972; amended by the State Convention meeting in Dallas, Texas on September 19, 1972; amended by the State Convention meeting in Houston, Texas on September 17, 1974; amended by the State Convention meeting in Fort Worth, Texas on June 19, 1976; amended by the State Convention meeting in Austin, Texas on September 11, 1976; amended by the State Convention meeting in Dallas, Texas on September 9, 1978; amended by the State Convention meeting in Houston, Texas on June 21, 1980; amended by the State Convention meeting in San Antonio, Texas on September 6, 1980; amended by the State Convention meeting in Austin, Texas on September 11, 1982; amended by the State Convention in Corpus Christi, Texas on September 22, 1984; amended by the State Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on November 23, 1985; amended by the State Convention in Dallas, Texas on June 28, 1986; amended at the State Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on May 30, 1987; amended at the State Executive Committee meeting in Copperas Cove, Texas on November 21, 1987; amended by the State Convention meeting in Houston, Texas on June 10, 1988; amended by the State Convention meeting in Fort Worth, Texas on June 30, 1990; amended by the State Convention meeting in Dallas, Texas on June 20, 1992; amended by the State Convention meeting in Fort Worth, Texas on June 11, 1994; amended by the State Convention meeting in Fort Worth, Texas on June 13, 1998; amended by the State Convention meeting in Houston, Texas on June 16, 2000; amended by the State Convention meeting in Dallas, Texas on June 8, 2002; amended by the State Convention meeting in San Antonio, Texas on June 4, 2004; amended by the State Convention meeting in San Antonio, Texas on June 3, 2006; amended by the State Convention meeting in Houston, Texas on June 13, 2008; amended by the State Convention meeting in Dallas, Texas on June 12, 2010; amended by the State Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on October 1, 2011; amended by the State Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on February 29, 2012; amended by the State Convention meeting in Fort Worth, Texas on June 8, 2012; amended by the State Executive Committee meeting in Austin, Texas on December 7, 2013. Pursuant to Section 163.006, Texas Election Code, any amendments made to these rules and contained herein which govern or affect the Republican Party of Texas’ general or runoff primary elections, conventions or nominees, are effective January 1, 2013.

The Texas Solution – just some thoughts

going to convention keep it redIt looks as though one of the big fights at next week’s biennial State Convention of the Republican Party of Texas will focus around the “Texas Solution,” a plank in the 2012 Platform. (See below **)  As usual, I have an opinion or two to share.

Of course, as a 2014 delegate, I’m not sure how I’m going to vote until I see the drafts.  I do know that – as in the past – I won’t allow one plank – or even several planks – to overcome my support for the only Party that protects life, liberty, property and is unquestionably the best defender of vulnerable life and marriage. If I’m willing to work with the Party, rest assured that I will be more than happy to work on common ground with the people in the party who have different opinions.

 

I do agree with most of the 2012 Texas Solution. I am most concerned with maintaining our Republican Party support of the rule of law rather than expediency and appeal to emotion. For the most part, I disagree with the parts that were left out, along with the Solution’s call to end birthright citizenship “without exceptions.”

 

I was a member of the 2012 Platform Committee. Due to pressure from influential Texans, we voted on the Solution at the very last minute, when we had no time to debate or win support proposed amendments. Our report was due at the printers at a given time, so we had a strict time line.

 

 The Committee narrowly voted against an amendment (made in spite of that deadline) that would have added a requirement that the process for a worker’s permit begin in the applicant’s country of origin.  If we support allowing them to apply at an office in the US, we not only repeat the mistake of the Reagan amnesty of 1986 (encouraging an influx of illegal aliens hoping to qualify), we increase the vulnerability of the current illegal alien.  Applicants would have to walk into a government facility, admit to being here illegally (whether they entered illegally or over-stayed a visa) , and our laws would need to either punish (fines), forgive or ignore his admission that he broke the law.

I am in favor of a very few exceptions to the above in the case of young adults who were brought here by parents when they were minors, but reached the age of majority.  In those cases, the applicants don’t actually admit to breaking laws and we don’t have to ignore the rule of law.

 

 

However, I’m firm on the opinion that minors should live with their parents, even if the parents go back to their home country.

 

I disagree with the people who want to shut down immigration completely and those who want to end birthright citizenship (although minors with citizenship would need to go home with their parents at the end of the work visa until they aren’t minors).  I also disagree with those who hold that people who have permits shouldn’t be allowed to bring their families. Our Party supports the family.

 

You may notice that I haven’t given links or names of the people who are talking about the Texas Solution. That was on purpose, because I don’t want to add to what is already acrimonious in-fighting.  These are truly “just some thoughts” of my own. What do you think?

 

 

**The Texas Solution as it appeared in the final 2012 Platform of the Republican Party of Texas:

The Texas Solution – Because of decades-long failure of the federal government to secure our borders and address the immigration issue, there are now upwards of 11 million undocumented individuals in the United States today, each of whom entered and remain here under different circumstances. Mass deportation of these individuals would neither be equitable nor practical; while blanket amnesty, as occurred with the Simpson-Mazzoli Act of 1986, would only encourage future violations of the law. We seek common ground to develop and advance a conservative, market- and law-based approach to our nation’s immigration issues by following these principles:

1. Secure Our Borders – The U.S. Border must be secured immediately! We demand the application of effective, practical and reasonable measures to secure our borders and to bring safety and security for all Americans along the border and throughout the nation.
2. Modernize the United States Social Security Card – We support the improvement of our 1936 Social Security card to use contemporary anti-counterfeit technology. The social security card will not be considered a National ID card for U.S. citizens.
3. Birthright Citizenship – We call on the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the United States to clarify Section 1 of the 14th amendment to limit citizenship by birth to those born to a citizen of the United States with no exceptions.
4. Create an Effective and Efficient Temporary Worker Program – A national Temporary Worker Program should be implemented to bring skilled and unskilled workers into the United States for temporary periods of time when no U.S. workers are currently available. The program should also require:

• Self-funding through participation fees and fines;
• Applicants must pass a full criminal background check;
• Applicants with prior immigration violations would only qualify for the program if they paid the appropriate fines;
• Applicants and/or Employers must prove that they can afford and/or secure private health insurance;
• Applicants must waive any and all rights to apply for financial assistance from any public entitlement programs;
• Applicant must show a proficiency in the English language and complete an American civic class;
• Temporary Workers would only be able to work for employers that deduct and match payroll taxes;
• All participants would be issued an individual Temporary-Worker Biometric Identification ard that tracks all address changes and both civil and criminal court appearances as a defendant.

Vote David Dewhurst for Texas Lieutenant Governor

Vote for DewhurstVote for David Dewhurst as Lieutenant Governor of Texas in the Republican Primary Runoff May 27, 2014!

 

David Dewhurst led the Texas Senate to pass strong legislation for Texas that so many other States haven’t been able to pass:

He held the line in 2003 when Dems ran to New Mexico and in 2011 when Doggett wrote Federal law specifically to prevent Texas from receiving education funds,

Tort reform for everyone, not just doctors like me,
The Defense of Marriage Act, followed by a DOMA amendment to Texas’ Constitution,
The Woman’s Right to Know Act requiring a 24 hour waiting period and informed consent for elective abortion,
Prioritized family planning funds, so Planned Parenthood was defunded,
Requirements that abortions after the 15th week be performed in an Ambulatory Surgical Center (ASC) followed by a law requiring that all abortions be performed in ASC’s,
Doctors who perform abortions must have admitting privileges with in 30 miles of the business,
Abortion businesses must offer the patient a sonogram and explain the findings,
Minors having an abortion must obtain parental consent and an afadavit that the person signing the consent is who they say they are,
A ban on 3rd trimester abortions in 2005, followed by a ban on all abortions after 5 months, except when the mother’s life is in danger.

And in case you missed it, Texas’ State spending is down from 2002 levels, when adjusted for inflation and population growth.  We have the lowest or second lowest debt per capita in the nation and the bulk of it is self-supporting by users, tolls, etc. 79% of our State debt is pensions. Look at independent reports like that last link and the State Comptroller’s reports.

My endorsements for Republican Primary Runoff Election 2014

Lieutenant Governor – David H. Dewhurst

Attorney General  –  Dan Branch

Agricultural Commissioner – Sid Miller

Railroad Commissioner –  Wayne Christian

Comal County Precinct 4 County Commissioner  Jen Crownover

Any questions?

Early Voting Today, Primary Run Off

VOTE

Did you know that Comal County Voters can vote in any of the Early Voting locations in your Texas County?  Did you know that the sites are open 7 AM to 7 PM, today?

If you happen to pass one of the Comal County Early Voting places while out and about today, you can stop in and vote, even if it’s not your usual voting location. (Take your photo ID!)

I hope you will vote for these people:  Lt. Governor: David Dewhurst,  Attorney General: Dan Branch, and Comal County Commissioner, Precinct 4: Jen Crownover.

Here are the four Early Voting locations in Comal County:

Comal County Elections Office
178 E. Mill St. Ste. 101, New Braunfels, TX 78130

Bulverde/Spring Branch Library
131 Bulverde Crossing, Bulverde, Texas 78163
Church In The Valley
14181 Hwy 306, Canyon Lake, Texas 78133

Garden Ridge City Hall
9400 Municipal Parkway, Garden Ridge, Texas 78266

The Texas Republican Primary Run Off Election Day is Tuesday, May 27.  On election day, you will have to go to your particular precinct voting site.

 

Lawsuits on the Left, Lawsuits on the Right

That lawsuit in which Dan Patrick revealed his mental health history isn’t new-news. In fact, he was criticized for failure to report it in a voters’ questionnaire just last January and it was covered in an article in the Texas Monthly, back in 2007.

If a person files a lawsuit claiming damages and mentions mental problems, his medical records will become part of the court records and public. Patrick initiated and lost both a criminal trial and a civil lawsuit against a Houston reporter and his newspaper, opening the door to last week’s revelations.

However, what should be news is the contrast between the reaction from the Right about Patrick’s lawsuit and Wendy Davis’ lawsuit seeking damages for the way a newspaper treated her:

Red State Abortion Barbie

 

and,

https://twitter.com/MQSullivan/statuses/398234066631151616mqs on davis lawsuit

 

 

 

 

 

Somehow, these same venues have not criticized Dan Patrick for his lawsuit demanding damages from a Houston newspaper and reporter.

The Left hasn’t missed the difference, and some have called it hypocrisy:

“So: both unsuccessfully sued the press, both endured revelations of mental anguish. The only real difference is that Patrick’s mental health troubles would seem, on the available evidence, to be much more substantial and long-lasting. Many conservatives in the state are rallying around Patrick: How did they treat Davis when her (very minor) admission was written up last November by noted slug pundit Eric Erickson?”

 

Sen. Deuell challenges Texas Right to Life over “slanderous” ads | Dallas Morning News

Remember: Senator Bob Duell was instrumental in convincing the medical community to adopt voluntary procedures to protect patients and families affected by the Texas Advance Directive Act, even though actual amendments to the law have been blocked by the very people attacking him.

How much “freedom” does a third party Political Action Committee have in their paid ads? Is it wrong to challenge them legally when the ads are blatantly false?

In this case, the ad opens by implying that Senator Duell is responsible for the too-short 10 day period allowed to find alternate care when the family or patient disagrees with the doctor at the end of life.

Senator Duell was not in the Senate when the Texas Advance Directive Act was passed in 1999. Members of the PAC, Texas Right to Life, were present and lobbied in favor of the Act.

In contrast, Senator Duell has for years been a strong advocate for amendments that would have increased the power of families to protect their loved ones in the case of disputes with the doctor.  The amendments would have changed the waiting period to at least a month before any disputed decisions by the doctor would take effect.

As to the challenge, Senator Duell has excellent support for his case:

The Texas Catholic Conference and Catholic Bishops of Texas, who supported Deuell’s bill, have debunked the claims. They said that Texas Right to Life “has tried to stoke fear through ridiculous claims of non-existent death panels and assertions that doctors are secretly trying to kill patients. Both claims are absurd.” The Catholic Conference also ripped Texas Right to Life for spreading “fabrications” about the position of Catholics on the issue.

via Sen. Deuell challenges Texas Right to Life over “slanderous” ads | Dallas Morning News.

Sample Ballot for Comal County Republican Runoff

Converted from .pdf at Comal County Elections Department website

Sample Runoff Ballot ComalCounty 2014

Comal County Primary Run Off Election Day Polling Places

Converted from the .pdf at the Comal County Elections Department website.

ELECTION DAY POLLING PLACES
REPUBLICAN AND DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY RUNOFF
MAY 27, 2014
PRECINCTS & POLLING PLACE:

101 103, 203 —- Comal County Senior Citizens Center, 655 Landa, New Braunfels

102, 106, 405 —- Bulverde/Spring Branch Library, 131 Bulverde Crossing, Bulverde

104, 105 —- Tye Preston Memorial Library, 16311 South Access Rd., Canyon Lake

204, 206 —- Bulverde Community Center, 1747 E. Ammann Rd., Bulverde

205 —- Jay F. Feibelman Garden Ridge Community Center, 9500 Municipal Parkway, Garden Ridge

201, 202, 301, 302, 303 —- St. Paul Lutheran Church, 181 S. Santa Clara Ave., New Braunfels

402, 403 —- Church In The Valley, 14181 FM 306 at Canyon City

Comal County Early Voting Locations Primary Run-off

Converted from the .pdf at the website of the Comal County Elections Department

MAIN LOCATION: Comal County Elections Office (los Centros Principales)
178 E. Mill St. Ste. 101
New Braunfels, TX 78130
DATES and HOURS: May 19-23, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (Fechas y Horas) (19-23 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

Location, Dates & Hours of Temporary Branch Early Voting Polling Locations (Lugar, Fechas y Horas de las Sucursales de los Centros Temporal de Votación para la Votación Anticipada)

Bulverde/Spring Branch Library
131 Bulverde Crossing, Bulverde, Texas 78163

May 19-23, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (19-23 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

 
Church In The Valley
14181 Hwy 306, Canyon Lake, Texas 78133

May 19-20, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.(19-20 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)
May 21, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (21 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.)
May 22-23, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.(22-23 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

Garden Ridge City Hall
9400 Municipal Parkway, Garden Ridge, Texas 78266

May 19, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (19 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
May 20, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (20 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)
May 21, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (21 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)
May 22, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. (22 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.)
May 23, 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (23 de mayo de 2014 – 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

Van De Putte doesn’t represent Texas voters (Planned Parenthood)

We are beginning to hear how great for the State of Texas it is that Leticia San Miguel Van De Putte will be the Democrat nominee for Lieutenant Governor in November. The story is that she will cause more Latinos to register to vote in the hopes that she will represent the 38% of Texas voters better than the Anglo man who will be nominated by the Republican Party.

Think so? I don’t.

Democrat Senator Judith Zaphirini nominated Senator Leticia Van de Putte for Senate President Pro Tempore on the opening day of the Texas 83rd Legislature on January 8, 2013:

Zaphirini speech, Opening day 2013 Texas Senate

http://tlcsenate.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=9&clip_id=284
Move the cursor to 45 minutes in, when Senator Zaphirini introduces Leticia Van de Putte’s children and grandchildren. Listen to the words, watch the faces around her.
“Six children, six grandchildren! What blessings! I’m not sure at what point in time Senator Van De Putte became such an advocate for Planned Parenthood, but her children are so glad that it wasn’t earlier than it actually was.”

Only YOU Can Prevent Property Tax Increases

Only YOUDo you REALLY want to do something about high property taxes in Texas? REALLY, REALLY, REALLY?

Then go VOTE  in your local City and School Board,etc. elections – TODAY!!!
There are no Texas State Property Taxes — only local property taxes.

Only you can prevent those increases by learning who is representing you on the Boards and Councils that are responsible!

Branch picks up Smitherman endorsement in AG race

While experience, leadership, and legal skills are important, perhaps the most important of all qualities needed to be Attorney General, the chief law enforcement officer in the State of Texas, is an unwavering commitment to compliance with both the letter and the spirit of the law. The Attorney General must have integrity, honesty, and high moral character.

Sen. Paxton’s recent admission that he broke the law when he failed to register with the State Securities Board, during a period of time when he was actively soliciting investments on behalf of “Fritz” Mowery, is very troubling.

via Branch picks up Smitherman endorsement in AG race.

Attending the Republican Party of Texas State Convention?

going to convention keep it redI’ve been lucky enough to attend the last 6 Republican Party of Texas State Conventions and served on the Platform Committee in 2012. This year, I was nominated to represent Senate District 25 on the Rules Committee. The most important thing I have learned from these experiences was that when parliamentary procedure isn’t followed, the results are questioned.

Delegates and alternates, especially those who are appointed to the Temporary Committees and/or elected to a Permanent Committee, should do a little homework and get acquainted with the scheduled agenda, the current Rules and Platform  and the guidelines of the current parliamentary procedure, Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised. There’s a summary of those latter Rules, here.

If you were selected as delegate or alternate by your County Convention, do everything you can to attend the State Convention. Go early, attend one of the open hearings of the Temporary Platform, Rules or Credentialing Committees on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday when non-members may speak at certain times and places. Speak up if you have something unique to say or if you hear proposals that go against our Republican principles.

Committees, Caucuses, and the delegates to the General Sessions shouldn’t just agree to what seems to be a consensus. Committees and sub-committees should take votes. Learn what it means to “call the question,” “divide the question,” or “demand a roll call vote” – a vote of the members is necessary for each of these.
If you are on one of the Temporary Committees or a delegate or seated delegate at the (State) Senate District Caucus or General Session, ensure that the meetings are held according to the correct parliamentary procedure. (There isn’t a Congressional District Caucus since this isn’t a Presidential election year. This means a few less meetings and votes and we all get to go home earlier.)
Ask around about who is running for State Republican Executive Committee (SREC). This Committee is made up of one man and one woman from the districts of the State Senators.  Ask why one candidate is better than the other. Think of questions about what the candidates believe the SREC can and can’t do in the two years between State RPT Conventions.

Finally, wear comfortable shoes and clothes and take extra water or sodas and some sort of snack to the General Sessions. The Fort Worth Convention Center is huge and you’ll do a lot of walking. The food and drink are insurance in case the meeting goes long. It’s very important that you stay to the end: if you don’t someone might make motions or cast votes you can’t agree with.

Our RPT is supposed to reflect the Republican voters of Texas and our Platform and Rules originate with those voters. Our “bottom up” representation is much more “democratic” than the “top-down” Party structure of the guys on the Left.

Do your homework. Go as early as you can. Speak up. Stick around to the end, so that your voice will be heard during the debate and vote on the Platform.

Edited – BBN to add graphic

Debate . . . between Dewhurst, Patrick

What Republican thinks it’s “dangerous” to have “a lot of money?”

Dan Patrick told the Houston Chronicle that Lieutenant Governor David H. Dewhurst is “dangerous because he has a lot of money.”

Dewhurst might be dangerous because of the skills he learned serving our Nation in the Air Force and CIA. But he’s not dangerous because of his success in business.

 

 

American Academy of Family Physicians resignation

AAFPI wrote a very difficult letter today. I  resigned from the organization that is supposed to support Family Physicians in our education, practice management and good medical care of our patients. Instead, the American  Academy of Family Physicians too often strays toward forcing its members to be complicit with controversial policies such as condoning gun control and over-the-counter contraceptive drugs, and condemnation of “reparative therapy” for homosexual patients, even when those patients are unhappy with their sexuality. I write about my main conflicts and the “final straw” in the letter:

 

It is with great regret that I write this letter as notice that I have decided not to renew either my Texas or American Academy of Family Practice membership. While I am still a family doctor, neither the Texas Academy of Family Practice (TAFP) nor the American Academy of Family Practice (AAFP) represent my political or ethical views.

The political, social and ethical controversies were the main reason I remained in the Academy for the last few years since I left full time practice. I hoped that I could make a difference by volunteering my time and money as an active participant in the Texas Academy, the National Conference of Special Constituencies, the AAFP list serves, the Academy Legislative meetings in DC and our annual AAFP Congress of Delegates.

From the time of Hillary Clinton’s closed meetings on healthcare to the endorsement of the passage of the ACA before it was written, the political actions of the AAFP leaders has disappointed me in Washington, DC. Our practice hassle factors have grown and grown, too often with the blessings of – and sometimes due to the experiments with alternative methods of practice by – the Academy.

The AAFP advocated for elective abortion before I joined as a Student member and I accepted that the burden of persuasion was on those of us who disagreed.

However, the Academy’s decision to advocate for the redefinition of marriage in 2012 and the refusal to reconsider the extracted Resolution on marriage neutrality at the 2013 Congress of Delegates in San Diego were the final proof that there’s no tolerance for family doctors who hold conservative politics or traditional ethics in the Academy.

Unfortunately, our TAFP spokesperson to the 2013 AAFP Reference Committee on Advocacy misrepresented the Texas Delegation’s instructions from the Directors on marriage. As I remember the discussion and vote, the intention was to allow the Texas delegates wide latitude in voting on any final form of the Resolution.

I hereby resign from the Texas Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Family Physicians and as a Fellow of the AAFP.

 

I waited to resign after nearly 30-year membership until the last minute before being dropped (for lack of paying my annual dues). There were several reasons for my hesitancy. For one thing, I didn’t want to be an undue influence on other members when they considered whether or not to write that hefty annual check to the Academy. For another, while I will continue to work with the AAFP and the Christian Medical and Dental Association to protect the right to life, marriage, the conscience rights of doctors within the profession of medicine and the specialty of Family Medicine, I do believe that it is important to work to persuade from within the organization. The biggest problem with finally writing the letter was that I was looking for a way to somehow keep my integrity while allowing the Academy to claim to represent me.

However, now that I’ve resigned, please consider sharing my letter with your family doctor. Many of them are unaware of the policies that our professional organizations push on good doctors of today and the students and residents who will be our doctors of tomorrow.

Texas doesn’t have State property taxes

I’m reading Republican primary run off ads stating that our Republican State Legislators and, in particular, the leader of the Senate – the Lieutenant Governor, David Dewhurst – haven’t done enough to lower property taxes. Well, those candidates are indulging in the worst sort of campaigning, since there are no State property taxes in Texas!

Here are the sources of State revenue in Texas: http://www.texastransparency.org/State_Finance/Budget_Finance/Reports/Revenue_by_Source/revenue_hist.php . The fact is that the bulk of Texas revenue comes from our sales tax and the return of tax money from the Federal Government.

In 2006, Lt. Governor David H. Dewhurst led the Senate when they cut and limited the amount local governments may assess as property tax rates and the property assessments those taxes are based on.

Unfortunately, the local districts *and their voters* raised those taxes up to the limit in some districts.

In areas such as Houston and Harris County, the appraisals are being *inflated* and/or *rising* nearly 100% due to the good economy there.  It seems that the problem is at the School Districts, City Councils, and County Commissioners Courts, not at the State legislature.

Again: there is no State property tax in Texas. The solution to high property taxes is in your home town, not Austin.

Windy/Wendy Davis gets lesbian Left “support” – as a sex object

Well, flip! Substitute my F-word for their F-word and drop the suggestion that even straight women want to “do ‘very sexy things’ to Windy, and I could have had the Vast WingRight Conspiracy laughing at this column. Ironically, the f’ing-bomb-this and f-bomb-that commenters all seem to take Wonkette’s “satire” take on Windy as a sex object as supportive!

Wonkette is a left-wing blog whose writers spew forth with a foul keyboard, and I think that she and her readers are serious about supporting Windy. It’s just that their support is . . .  shall we say “bent?”

Most of the readers of WingRight would agree that it’s preposterous to complain about “ties” to a Political Action Committee with which Greg Abbott has had no dealings since 2004. And it’s true that Windy ain’t Ann Richards.

But Wonkette’s Rebecca Shoenkopf is mostly upset that Windy’s campaign might object to the “very sexy things” comment.

Even odder than a feminists’ objection to an imagined objection from Windy  is the use of an Austin-American Statesman article entitled Greg Abbott holds double-digit lead over Wendy Davis, who is viewed unfavorably by almost half the electorate” to support the idea that Greg Abbott is a “nothingburger:” “

Feds List Lesser Prairie Chicken as Threatened

What about evolution?

The Obama administration said Thursday it is placing a grassland grouse known as the lesser prairie chicken on a list of threatened species, a move that could affect oil and gas drilling, wind farms and other activities in five central and southwestern states.

The decision by the Fish and Wildlife Service is a step below “endangered” status and allows for more flexibility in how protections for the bird will be carried out under the Endangered Species Act.

Dan Ashe, the agency’s director, said he knows the decision will be unpopular with governors in the five affected states — Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico — but said the agency was following the best science available.

“The lesser prairie-chicken is in dire straits,” Ashe said in an interview. “The bird is in decline and has been in decline for more than a decade.”

The prairie chicken, a type of grouse known for its colorful neck plume and stout build, has lost more than 80 percent of its traditional habitat, mostly because of human activity such as oil and gas drilling, ranching and construction of power lines and wind turbines, Ashe said. The bird, which weighs from 1-1/2 to 2 pounds, has also been severely impacted by the region’s ongoing drought.

Biologists say a major problem is that prairie chickens fear tall structures, where predators such as hawks can perch and spot them. Wind turbines, electricity transmission towers and drilling rigs are generally the tallest objects on the plains.

via Feds List Lesser Prairie Chicken as Threatened – ABC News.

Fifth Circuit Paves Way for Supreme Court Showdown on Chemical Abortion Regulations | National Review Online

The Fifth Circuit pointed out that Planned Parenthood offered no real evidence to support its challenge to the Texas provision. On the other hand, the State provided ample medical evidence to support the regulation. Citing the State’s expert Dr. Donna Harrison, the court noted that the FDA approved the RU-486 regimen with restrictions, including a patient agreement that requires the woman (and the physician) to confirm that she is no more than 49 days pregnant.

Further, the court rejected Planned Parenthood’s claim that chemical abortion is necessary for some women who cannot undergo surgical abortion—noting that the abortion giant provided no real evidence for that claim. To the contrary, Dr. Harrison testified that 6 percent of chemical abortions fail and eventually require surgery, meaning that it would be medically irresponsible for a physician to administer a chemical abortion to a woman for whom a later surgical abortion might be contraindicated.

It’s important to note that the decision marks one of the most straightforward applications of the Supreme Court’s 2007 Gonzales v. Carhart decision. Citing Gonzales, the Fifth Circuit concluded that the Texas chemical-abortion regulation does not require an exception for the life and health of the woman because the group of women who allegedly “need” chemical abortions (those for whom Planned Parenthood claimed surgical abortion is contraindicated) was vague and undefined, because Planned Parenthood failed to provide any evidence that such a group of women even exists, and because, as highlighted by Dr. Harrison’s testimony, there is disagreement regarding whether chemical abortions are “safer” for these women when subsequent surgical abortion—alleged to be dangerous for such women—may be necessary.

via Fifth Circuit Paves Way for Supreme Court Showdown on Chemical Abortion Regulations | National Review Online.

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